Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I need to check the condition of keyboard visibility in my iPhone app.

like:

if(keyboardIsPresentOnWindow) {
    //Do action 1
}
else if (keyboardIsNotPresentOnWindow) {
    //Do action 2
}

So please help. How can I check this condition?

share|improve this question
6  
Your conditions are identical. – Zian Choy Sep 29 '09 at 4:33
    
What app? What language? What platform? My best guess is iPhone? – Nick Bedford Sep 29 '09 at 4:33
2  
Question fixed. Let the games begin! – Robert Harvey Sep 29 '09 at 4:48

13 Answers 13

drawnonward's code is very close, but collides with UIKit's namespace and could be made easier to use.

@interface KeyboardStateListener : NSObject {
    BOOL _isVisible;
}
+ (KeyboardStateListener *)sharedInstance;
@property (nonatomic, readonly, getter=isVisible) BOOL visible;
@end

static KeyboardStateListener *sharedInstance;

@implementation KeyboardStateListener

+ (KeyboardStateListener *)sharedInstance
{
    return sharedInstance;
}

+ (void)load
{
    NSAutoreleasePool *pool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];
    sharedInstance = [[self alloc] init];
    [pool release];
}

- (BOOL)isVisible
{
    return _isVisible;
}

- (void)didShow
{
    _isVisible = YES;
}

- (void)didHide
{
    _isVisible = NO;
}

- (id)init
{
    if ((self = [super init])) {
        NSNotificationCenter *center = [NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter];
        [center addObserver:self selector:@selector(didShow) name:UIKeyboardDidShowNotification object:nil];
        [center addObserver:self selector:@selector(didHide) name:UIKeyboardWillHideNotification object:nil];
    }
    return self;
}

@end
share|improve this answer
4  
Why does it need its own pool? – Dan Rosenstark Jul 1 '10 at 21:27
16  
+load is a special method called by the Objective-C runtime. It is called for each class after the app binary loads, but before the main() function is entered. There is no guarantee that an autorelease pool will be live. – rpetrich Jul 2 '10 at 17:29
1  
MattDiPasquale: If the +load method is deleted, sharedInstance will never be initialized. Since there is no guarantee that an autorelease pool is active when the runtime invokes a +load method, wrapping all calls to system-provided classes is necessary in case they call autorelease. – rpetrich Sep 26 '10 at 12:10
3  
Nice answer! I know this is several years old but the NSAutoreleasePool alloc/release can now be replaced by surrounding the code in @autoreleasepool { } – chown Sep 12 '12 at 23:06
2  
Don't forget to remove the Observer, probably in KeyboardStateListener's dealloc. – SushiGrass Jacob Feb 7 '13 at 19:12

…or take the easy way:

When you enter a textField, it becomes first responder and the keyboard appears. You can check the status of the keyboard with [myTextField isFirstResponder]. If it returns YES, then the the keyboard is active.

share|improve this answer
11  
Good solution, however this will NOT work, if a hardware keyboard is used (not unusual on the iPad). – Andrei Herford Sep 25 '14 at 14:20
    
This doesn't answer the question. This tells you if the text field is the first responder. I have a view controller with multiple child view controllers, all of which contain UITextFields. Using this method, i cannot tell from my parent view controller whether the keyboard is shown. The only reliable way is to use the notification method explained in the other answers – TimWhiting Jul 16 '15 at 20:43

Create a UIKeyboardListener when you know the keyboard is not visible, for example by calling [UIKeyboardListener shared] from applicationDidFinishLaunching.

@implementation UIKeyboardListener

+ (UIKeyboardListener) shared {
    static UIKeyboardListener sListener;    
    if ( nil == sListener ) sListener = [[UIKeyboardListener alloc] init];

    return sListener;
}

-(id) init {
    self = [super init];

    if ( self ) {
        NSNotificationCenter        *center = [NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter];
        [center addObserver:self selector:@selector(noticeShowKeyboard:) name:UIKeyboardDidShowNotification object:nil];
        [center addObserver:self selector:@selector(noticeHideKeyboard:) name:UIKeyboardWillHideNotification object:nil];
    }

    return self;
}

-(void) noticeShowKeyboard:(NSNotification *)inNotification {
    _visible = true;
}

-(void) noticeHideKeyboard:(NSNotification *)inNotification {
    _visible = false;
}

-(BOOL) isVisible {
    return _visible;
}

@end
share|improve this answer

I think you need to use the notifications that are provided about the keyboard:

From: http://developer.apple.com/iphone/library/documentation/UIKit/Reference/UITextField_Class/Reference/UITextField.html

Keyboard Notifications

When the system shows or hides the keyboard, it posts several keyboard notifications. These notifications contain information about the keyboard, including its size, which you can use for calculations that involve moving views. Registering for these notifications is the only way to get some types of information about the keyboard. The system delivers the following notifications for keyboard-related events:

* UIKeyboardWillShowNotification
* UIKeyboardDidShowNotification
* UIKeyboardWillHideNotification
* UIKeyboardDidHideNotification

For more information about these notifications, see their descriptions in UIWindow Class Reference. For information about how to show and hide the keyboard, see Text and Web.

share|improve this answer
    
I checked these notification, but don't know how to check these notifications. If you could post some example,that would be very helpful. – Jitendra Singh Sep 29 '09 at 5:09
2  
Have a look at NSNotificationCenter. You'll have to register for the notifications you're interested in. Don't forget to unregister when your application exits. – Thomas Müller Sep 29 '09 at 5:17

Now in iOS8 this solution of course doesn't work. It was written initially for IOS4/5.

Try this solution:

- (BOOL) isKeyboardOnScreen 
{
    BOOL isKeyboardShown = NO;

    NSArray *windows = [UIApplication sharedApplication].windows;
    if (windows.count > 1) {
        NSArray *wSubviews =  [windows[1]  subviews];
        if (wSubviews.count) {
            CGRect keyboardFrame = [wSubviews[0] frame];
            CGRect screenFrame = [windows[1] frame];
            if (keyboardFrame.origin.y+keyboardFrame.size.height == screenFrame.size.height) {
                isKeyboardShown = YES;
            }
        }
    }

    return isKeyboardShown;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
It's invalid to assume that multiple windows implies a keyboard, and that the keyboard always the second element. – jmah Apr 8 '14 at 6:25
1  
@jmah Of course it is not the universal approach but it covers huge amount of application cases. Any try to get info about keyboard use some specific view hierarchy because Apple doesn't provide any useful API for this case. – malex Apr 8 '14 at 7:30
    
This does not works, what worked for me was iterate through all views and for all UITextFields or UITextView check if they are first responders...if any of then return true keyboard is visible else its not – amd Aug 13 '14 at 14:54

Using the window subview hierarchy as indication for keyboard showing is a hack. If Apple changers their underlying implementation all these answers would break.

The correct way would be to monitor Keyboard show and hide notifications application wide such as inside your App Delegate:

In AppDelegate.h:

@interface AppDelegate : UIResponder <UIApplicationDelegate>

@property (assign, nonatomic) BOOL keyboardIsShowing;

@end

In AppDelegate.m:

- (BOOL)application:(UIApplication *)application didFinishLaunchingWithOptions:(NSDictionary *)launchOptions
{

    // Monitor keyboard status application wide
    self.keyboardIsShowing = NO;
    [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self selector:@selector(keyboardWillShow:)
                                             name:UIKeyboardWillShowNotification object:nil];
    [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self selector:@selector(keyboardWillBeHidden:)
                                             name:UIKeyboardWillHideNotification object:nil];

    return YES;
}

- (void)keyboardWillShow:(NSNotification*)aNotification
{
    self.keyboardIsShowing = YES;
}

- (void)keyboardWillBeHidden:(NSNotification*)aNotification
{
    self.keyboardIsShowing = NO;
}

Then you can check using:

BOOL keyboardIsShowing = ((AppDelegate*)[UIApplication sharedApplication].delegate).keyboardIsShowing;

It should be noted the keyboard show/hide notifications will not fire when user is using a bluetooth or external keyboard.

share|improve this answer

This is from the iOS Text Programming Guide published by Apple here: https://developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/StringsTextFonts/Conceptual/TextAndWebiPhoneOS/KeyboardManagement/KeyboardManagement.html

Basically call "registerForKeyBoardNotifications" in your ViewDidLoad. Then every time the keyboard becomes active, "keyboardWasShown" is called. And every time the keyboard disappears, "keyboardWillBeHidden" is called.

// Call this method somewhere in your view controller setup code.
- (void)registerForKeyboardNotifications {
    [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self selector:@selector(keyboardWasShown:) name:UIKeyboardDidShowNotification object:nil];
    [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self selector:@selector(keyboardWillBeHidden:) name:UIKeyboardWillHideNotification object:nil];
}

// Called when the UIKeyboardDidShowNotification is sent.
- (void)keyboardWasShown:(NSNotification*)aNotification {
    NSLog(@"Keyboard is active.");
    NSDictionary* info = [aNotification userInfo];
    CGSize kbSize = [[info objectForKey:UIKeyboardFrameBeginUserInfoKey] CGRectValue].size;

    UIEdgeInsets contentInsets = UIEdgeInsetsMake(0.0, 0.0, kbSize.height, 0.0);
    scrollView.contentInset = contentInsets;
    scrollView.scrollIndicatorInsets = contentInsets;

    // If active text field is hidden by keyboard, scroll it so it's visible
    // Your app might not need or want this behavior.
    CGRect aRect = self.view.frame;
    aRect.size.height -= kbSize.height;
    if (!CGRectContainsPoint(aRect, activeField.frame.origin) ) {
        [self.scrollView scrollRectToVisible:activeField.frame animated:YES];
    }
}

// Called when the UIKeyboardWillHideNotification is sent
- (void)keyboardWillBeHidden:(NSNotification*)aNotification {
    NSLog(@"Keyboard is hidden");
    UIEdgeInsets contentInsets = UIEdgeInsetsZero;
    scrollView.contentInset = contentInsets;
    scrollView.scrollIndicatorInsets = contentInsets;
}
share|improve this answer

A few observations:

The recommended pattern for a singleton object would be as follows. dispatch_once makes sure the class is initialised once in a thread-safe way, and the static variable isn't visible outside. And it's standard GCD, so no need to know about low level details of Objective-C.

+ (KeyboardStateListener *)sharedInstance
{
    static KeyboardStateListener* shared;
    static dispatch_once_t onceToken;
    dispatch_once(&onceToken, ^{
        shared = [[KeyboardStateListener alloc] init];
        // Other initialisations
    });

    return shared;
}

Usually you don't want to know just whether the keyboard is visible or not, but how big it is. Keyboards don't all have the same size. iPhone keyboards are smaller than iPad keyboards. So you'd want another property @property (readonly, nonatomic) CGRect keyboardRect; which is set in the noticeShowKeyboard: method like this:

NSValue* value = notification.userInfo [UIKeyboardFrameEndUserInfoKey];
_keyboardRect = value.CGRectValue;

Important to notice that the rectangle is in UIWindow coordinates and doesn't respect screen rotation. So the caller would convert that rectangle by calling

KeyboardStateListener* listener = [KeyboardStateListener sharedInstance];
CGRect windowRect = listener.keyboardRect;
CGRect viewRect = [myView convertRect:windowRect fromView:self.window];

If the user rotates the screen while the keyboard is visible, the app will be told that the keyboard is hidden, then shown again. When it is shown, other views are most likely not rotated yet. So if you observe keyboard hide/show events yourself, convert the coordinates when you actually need them, not in the notification.

If the user splits or undocks the keyboard, or uses a hardware keyboard, the notifications will always show the keyboard as hidden. Undocking or merging the keyboard will send a "keyboard shown" notification.

The listener must be initialised while the keyboard is hidden, otherwise the first notification will be missed, and it will be assumed that the keyboard is hidden when it's not.

So it is quite important to know what you actually want. This code is useful to move things out of the way of the keyboard (with a split or undocked keyboard, that's the responsibility of the user). It doesn't tell you whether the user can see a keyboard on the screen (in case of a split keyboard). It doesn't tell you whether the user can type (for example when there is a hardware keyboard). Looking at other windows doesn't work if the app creates other windows itself.

share|improve this answer
    
Good warnings about keyboard in iPad, thanx! – JOM Jun 4 '15 at 15:48

And here's how to do it in Swift:

 func registerForKeyboardNotifications() {
    NSNotificationCenter.defaultCenter().addObserver(
        self,
        selector: "keyboardWasShown:",
        name: UIKeyboardDidShowNotification,
        object: nil)

    NSNotificationCenter.defaultCenter().addObserver(
        self,
        selector: "keyboardWillBeHidden:",
        name: UIKeyboardWillHideNotification,
        object: nil)
}

func keyboardWasShown(notification: NSNotification) {
    println("Keyboard was shown");
}

func keyboardWillBeHidden(notification: NSNotification) {
    println("Keyboard was dismissed");
}

Don't forget to unregister:

 override func viewWillDisappear(animated: Bool) {
    NSNotificationCenter.defaultCenter().removeObserver(self,
        name: UIKeyboardDidShowNotification,
        object: nil)

    NSNotificationCenter.defaultCenter().removeObserver(self,
        name: UIKeyboardWillHideNotification,
        object: nil)
}

And if you want to dismiss keyboard on pressing the "Return" button:

class ViewController: UIViewController, UITextFieldDelegate {

@IBOutlet weak var yourTextField: UITextField!

override func viewDidLoad() {
    super.viewDidLoad()
    registerForKeyboardNotifications()
    yourTextField.delegate = self
}

func textFieldShouldReturn(textField: UITextField!) -> Bool {
    self.view.endEditing(true);
    return false;
}

}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks. this is useful – alcedo Apr 9 '15 at 5:55

Try this function

BOOL UIKeyboardIsVisible(){

BOOL keyboardVisible=NO;
// Locate non-UIWindow.
UIWindow *keyboardWindow = nil;
for (UIWindow *testWindow in [[UIApplication sharedApplication] windows]) {
    if (![[testWindow class] isEqual:[UIWindow class]]) {
        keyboardWindow = testWindow;
        break;
    }
}
// Locate UIKeyboard.
for (UIView *possibleKeyboard in [keyboardWindow subviews]) {
    // iOS 4 sticks the UIKeyboard inside a UIPeripheralHostView.
    if ([[possibleKeyboard description] hasPrefix:@"<UIPeripheralHostView"]) {
        keyboardVisible=YES;
    }
    if ([[possibleKeyboard description] hasPrefix:@"<UIKeyboard"]) {
        keyboardVisible=YES;
        break;
    }
}
return keyboardVisible;

}

from: iOS: How to access the `UIKeyboard`?

share|improve this answer

BOOL isTxtOpen = [txtfieldObjct isFirstReponder]. If it returns YES, then the the keyboard is active.

share|improve this answer

To check weather keyboard is appeared, we can use the Keyboard predefined notifications.

UIKeyboardDidShowNotification ,UIKeyboardDidHideNotification

For example I can use the following code to listen the keyboard notification

// Listen for keyboard appearances and disappearances

[[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self 
                                         selector:@selector(keyboardDidShow:)
                                             name:UIKeyboardDidShowNotification
                                           object:nil];

[[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self
                                         selector:@selector(keyboardDidHide:)
                                             name:UIKeyboardDidHideNotification
                                           object:nil];

in the methods I can get notifications

- (void)keyboardDidShow: (NSNotification *) notifyKeyBoardShow{
    // key board is closed
}

- (void)keyboardDidHide: (NSNotification *) notifyKeyBoardHide{
    // key board is opened
}
share|improve this answer

I think this may help u,

+(BOOL)isKeyBoardInDisplay  {

    BOOL isExists = NO;
    for (UIWindow *keyboardWindow in [[UIApplication sharedApplication] windows])   {
        if ([[keyboardWindow description] hasPrefix:@"<UITextEffectsWindow"] == YES) {
            isExists = YES;
        }  
    }

    return isExists;
}

thanks,

Naveen Shan

share|improve this answer
1  
On iOS 6, Only works hasn't appeared yet! Once they keyboard has been showed once, its stop working. – James Laurenstin Apr 30 '13 at 15:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.