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I want to query for entities which are similar to a given entity (of the same type). The similarity is (in the simplest case) defined as number of the same items in a member collection.

How would the JPQL/HQL query look like?

What I tried:

       SELECT wuSimilar, COUNT(*) AS score FROM WorkUnit wuBase 
           LEFT JOIN wuBase.tags AS wubTags
           LEFT JOIN WorkUnit wuSimilar ON wubTags IN wuSimilar.tags
           WHERE wuBase = :base
           GROUP BY wuSimilar
           ORDER BY score DESC

This is basically searching, so I could use Hibernate Search, but not sure if it's not an overkill. Alternatively, I am open to things like ElasticSearch, in which case the question would be, does it pay of to bring it in just for this one case? I won't probably have another search in this project.

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I was quite close, I just relied too much on my SQL knowledge. JPQL only uses JOIN for declared entity relations.

When selecting a list defined by expression in WHERE, it has to be comma join.

       SELECT wuSimilar, COUNT(*) AS score FROM WorkUnit wuBase 
           LEFT JOIN wuBase.tags AS wubTags
           , WorkUnit wuSimilar
           WHERE wuBase = :base AND wubTags IN (wuSimilar.tags)
           GROUP BY wuSimilar
           ORDER BY score DESC

Seems to work, going to test.

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I would have used Hibernate Search, it's designed for this and a lot more efficient than the super join solution. Not least, you get auto-tagging capabilities and natural language processing for a better control of the similarity functions. – Sanne Sep 16 '14 at 17:49

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