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I'm creating a hex, decimal and binary converter and it's going well so far. This is my second project on the iPhone and I'm a beginner. However, I was wondering how can I simplify what I have (a bunch of if statements). I have:

if (entered is hex)
     if (binary button clicked)
         convert to binary
     if (decimal button clicked)
         convert to decimal
     else (hex button clicked)
         keep in hex and inform
else if (entered is binary)
     if (hex button clicked)
         convert to hex
     if (decimal button clicked)
         convert to decimal
     else (binary button clicked)
         keep in binary and inform user
else if (entered is decimal)
     if (hex button clicked)
         convert to binary
     if (binary button clicked)
         convert to hex
     else (decimal button clicked)
         keep in decimal and inform user    
else   
    give error if something else entered in 

This looks quite repetitive to me. All these are in one class, all of these if statement are very similar to one another, and so I was wondering if there is something I could do?

Thanks for your time.

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What is "hex button clicked"? –  user523234 Feb 16 '13 at 3:05
    
How are you determining what type the entry is? Is this based on a button click too, or which text field is used for entry? Something else? –  rdelmar Feb 16 '13 at 3:48
    
Your code is already good enough to read . Additional breaking up of code to function is not needed but can be done to increase readability. –  Pushpak Narasimhan Feb 16 '13 at 4:47
1  
You're probably missing some elses. –  Hot Licks Feb 16 '13 at 4:59
    
@HotLicks means that your second if in each group should be an else if instead. –  lnafziger Feb 16 '13 at 5:14

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I would always store the entered value (internally) in the same format (let's use hex for this example). Then, you can use something like this, which is much more streamlined:

// Convert the user entered value to hex
if (enteredValue is hex)
    internalHexValue = enteredValue
else if (entered is binary)
    internalHexValue = convert enteredValue (binary) to hex
else if (entered is decimal)
    internalHexValue = convert enteredValue (decimal) to hex
else
    error and return

// Now, you have far less repetition because you only have to convert from hex:
if (binary button clicked)
    convertedValue = convert internalHexValue to binary
else if (decimal button clicked)
    convertedValue = convert internalHexValue to decimal
else (hex button clicked)
    convertedValue = internalHexValue

// Lastly, see if they selected the same format for input and output:
if (enteredValue == convertedValue)
    inform user

You could also break the example above into multiple methods in order to make it easier to read by writing it like this (error checking removed for clarity):

internalHexValue = [self convertEnteredValueToHex:enteredValue];
convertedValue   = [self convertHexValueToUserSelectedFormat:internalHexValue];
if (enteredValue == convertedValue)
    inform user

I would also make all of the "convert XXX to XXX" lines different methods within your class.

share|improve this answer
    
I'd move the enteredType == targetType check first, but otherwise that's the way to go, if a common internal form will be used. Factoring the code is almost always a step in the right direction. –  Hot Licks Feb 16 '13 at 14:00
    
@HotLicks: I would normally check that first as well, however in this case it takes almost as much code to make that check first as it does to calculate the value, so this is faster and easier to read... –  lnafziger Feb 16 '13 at 17:48
    
The check of whether the specified input and output types are identical should be almost free. –  Hot Licks Feb 16 '13 at 18:27
    
Possibly. It's hard to tell from pseudo code though, and since he used terms like "entered is hex" -vs- "binary button clicked", I assume tha he is using different methods of determining each one, which would require another series of if/else statements. I agree with you, however in this case I think that if might be a little simpler this way. –  lnafziger Feb 16 '13 at 19:51
1  
Thanks a lot :)! –  StackPWRequirmentsAreCrazy Feb 19 '13 at 0:16

Break it up into several methods, the following is rather conceptual and does not address unnecessary repletion or lack of brackets:

    if (entered is hex)
        [self isHex];
    else if (entered is binary)
        [self isBinary];
    else if (entered is decimal)
        [self isDecimal];
        keep in decimal and inform user
    else
        give error if something else entered in
    return 0;
}

- (void)isHex {
    if (binary button clicked)
        convert to binary
    else if (decimal button clicked)
        convert to decimal
    else (hex button clicked)
        keep in hex and inform
}

- (void)isBinary {
    if (hex button clicked)
        convert to hex
    else if (decimal button clicked)
        convert to decimal
    else (binary button clicked)
        keep in binary and inform user
}

- (void)isDecimal {
    if (hex button clicked)
        convert to binary
    else if (binary button clicked)
        convert to hex
    else (decimal button clicked)
        keep in decimal and inform user
}
share|improve this answer

use switch, it is very smooth, do like below

switch (entered )
{
case hex:
     if (binary button clicked)
         convert to binary
     else if (decimal button clicked)
         convert to decimal
     else (hex button clicked)
         keep in hex and inform
break;

case binary:

     if (hex button clicked)
         convert to hex
     else if (decimal button clicked)
         convert to decimal
     else (binary button clicked)
         keep in binary and inform user
break;

case  decimal:

     if (hex button clicked)
         convert to binary
     else if (binary button clicked)
         convert to hex
     else (decimal button clicked)
         keep in decimal and inform user  
break;  

default:

    give error if something else entered in 
}
share|improve this answer
1  
That really isn't any cleaner at all! –  duskwuff Feb 16 '13 at 3:44
1  
Not to mention that decimal/hex/etc may not be a value which can be used in a switch statement.... –  lnafziger Feb 16 '13 at 4:28
    
@lnafziger -- The decimal/hex/etc indication can most certainly be converted into a simple integer (though the conversion may be complex). And you can convert both in and out types to integer, shift one, and add, to reduce the entire thing to one simple switch, without the inside if statements. –  Hot Licks Feb 17 '13 at 13:22
    
@HotLicks - Yes, you can make almost anything work. But by this point, is it really any better than what he started with? –  lnafziger Feb 17 '13 at 17:42

The if statements which you have mentioned are not same.

Say, When binary button is pressed, to convert the number in binary, you will need two different functions.

  1. Hex to binary (input is in hex)
  2. Decimal to binary (input is in decimal)

So, effectively you are calling different functions.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think that this really answers his question.... –  lnafziger Feb 16 '13 at 5:17

As @apurv implies, your decisions are unique (entered + clicked), you really can't do much to simplify it or crush it down (as if you had some sort of a repeating pattern). Best you can do is to make it as readable as possible, and what you have is just fine. It's quite simple to understand. This is one of those cases where any attempt to 'simplify' or to make it more elegant will probably make it unnecessarily complex and less readable.

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Alternative (not necessarily my favorite):

int inputFmt = <input format reduced to integer 0..2>
int outputFmt = <output format reduced to integer 0..2>

int switchValue = (inputFmt * 4) + outputFmt;

switch (switchValue) {
    case BinaryFmtConst * 4 + BinaryFmtConst:
        <convert binary -> binary>
        break;
    case BinaryFmtConst * 4 + DecimalFmtConst:
        <convert binary -> decimal>
        break;
. . .
    case DecimalFmtConst * 4 + BinaryFmtConst:
        <convert decimal -> binary>
        break;
. . .
    case HexFmtConst * 4 + HexFmtConst:
        <convert hex -> hex>
        break;
    default:
        <error message>
}
share|improve this answer

Why not use switch statements for better readability?

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