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What I mean is that for example, there are class A, class B and class C. A, B, C all have a method void M(), but none of them are declared implemented any interface.

So I give an interface with a void M() constraint. But the class A, B, C are types in a assembly.

Is there any way to use those class as if they are already implemented an interface.

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Do you not control the code of the assembly? –  shenku Feb 16 '13 at 2:58
    
This is not possible of course. You have to rewrite that code. Using Reflection is a distant second solution. –  Hans Passant Feb 16 '13 at 2:59
    
The classes I mentioned are maintenanced by other team, I don't think a modification of these classes is a good idea in my situation. So I choose to use the solution that Thomas Levesque and Alexei Levenkov given. Thanks a lot. –  Li Zhen Feb 17 '13 at 14:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

No, you can't modify existing classes this way.

You can derive new classes and say they implement new interface. Existing methods in base class will be picked as interface implementation.

interface IWithM
{
  void M();
}

class MyA : A, IWithM
{
  // IWithM.M will be picked from A.M
}
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No, there is no way to do that.

You could, however, write adapter classes that inherit from A, B and C and implement the interface.

public class AAdapter : A, IMyInterface
{
}
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Really help. Thanks. –  Li Zhen Feb 17 '13 at 14:02

With the decorator pattern.

You could create your own version of these classes and then decorate the implementation, without modifing the assembly owned by someone else.

Your interface:

public interface IImplementsM()
{
  void M();
}

public class MyA : IImplementsM 
{
   private A _a;

   public MyA(A a){
     _a = a;
   }

   public void M(){
     _a.M();
   }

}

Then in your code instead of using A you can use your own version or the Interface.

// some other class

public void DoSomething(IImplementsM implementsM)
{
 implementsM.M();
}

And to execute could be something like:

 var myA = new MyA(new A());
 DoSomething(myA);

Advantage, you can now have a contraint when working in your own code.

Distadvantage, you have to then use your version of the class in your assembly, not theirs.

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