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I'm trying to find out the local maximum in a list. Basically I am to find values that are greater than the element before the list and the element after it, and the result should be a list of all the local maximum values.

Example: so a query local_maximum([3,2,3,4,5,2,7,3,6,5], Answer) should answer Answer=[5,7,6] (since 5>4 , 5>2... 7>2, 7>3 and so on..)

My logic is do you keep doing recursive calls until you reach only 3 elements in the list. You check if the middle element is greater than the left and right element, and if it is you add it to the list.

Also, my intention is as I go up the recursive call tree, I always want to check whether the second element in the recursive call tree is greater than the one left and right to it.
i.e

1,3,5,2,1
|
3,5,2,1
|
5,2,1
BASE CASE
checks if 2 is greater than 5, and 1.... append nothing...
|
3,5,2,1
checks if 5 is greater than 3 and 2, append 5... 

so on..

/*base case stop if it reaches 3 elements*/
local_maximum([X,Y,Z], Answer):- Y>X, Y>Z, Answer is Y. 
local_maximum([X,Y,Z], []):- Y<X, Y<Z.

local_maximum([H|T], Answer):-
local_maximum(T, Answer), append([], Answer, Answer).

I don't know how to go about on this... sorry for my english. regards,


Solved.

You can check while you visit the list, and save just elements that fits:

local_maximum([X,Y,Z|Xs], [Y|Ms]) :-
Y>X, Y>Z,
local_maximum([Z|Xs], Ms).

then add the skip and the base case rules. The way you write the skip case will influence the rule above, requiring a cut placed here. This because Prolog will search alternatives on request! I think that the added cut improves readability of the 'program'.

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I am glad that you solved your problem. But in saying so you have obliterated your question. I am going to revert your change so that it can be of help to others. –  Mark Hall Feb 18 '13 at 1:48

1 Answer 1

you can check while you visit the list, and save just elements that fits:

local_maximum([X,Y,Z|Xs], [Y|Ms]) :-
  Y>X, Y>Z,
  local_maximum([Z|Xs], Ms).

then add the skip and the base case rules. The way you write the skip case will influence the rule above, requiring a cut placed here. This because Prolog will search alternatives on request! I think that the added cut improves readability of the 'program'.

I tested the version with the cut:

?- local_maximum([3,2,3,4,5,2,7,3,6,5], Answer).
Answer = [5, 7, 6].

?- local_maximum([1,2,1,2,1], Answer).
Answer = [2, 2].
share|improve this answer
    
When you say 'skip', do you mean if and else statement? I added the following. local_maximum([X,Y,Z|Xs], [Y|Ms]) :- ( Y>X, Y>Z -> local_maximum([Z|Xs], Ms) ; local_maximum([Y|Xs], []|Ms) ). Also, I've added a couple of base cases... 3 cases for if it ends up having 3 elements at the end and 1 for if it has only 2 elements at the end. What happened when I traced this was it treated the whole list as one element.... Odd... –  GoldAK47 Feb 16 '13 at 8:46
    
Good old Prolog encoded alternative by means of, well, alternative rules. Try adding another rule that handle the skip case, and leaving unchanged (apart the eventual cut), the rule I shown. –  CapelliC Feb 16 '13 at 9:35
    
This is amazing. Thanks, man. Can't believe I overcomplicated things while I was debugging. –  GoldAK47 Feb 16 '13 at 10:05

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