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div>p selects all <p> elements where the parent is a <div> element and div p selects all <p> elements inside <div> elements. This is what W3schools says but i dont know what is the difference. If an element is inside another one is child and the other is parent. I dont see the differences.

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marked as duplicate by Tieson T., mgibsonbr, DocMax, Jukka K. Korpela, Julius Feb 16 '13 at 9:45

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5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Example:

<div>
    <span>
        <p>...</p>
    <span>
</div>

div > p won't select that paragraph, but div p will. In other words, the first selector is parent-child, while the second is ancestor-descendant.

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div >p select direct child of div which is p whereas div p select every p inside div no matter if p is child of other dom with in div. Also you can say div>p is css 3 selector.

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div > p means "Select all <p> elements that are children of a <div>", e.g. only the first

will be selected here:

<div>
  <p>...</p>
  <div>
    <p>...</p>
  </div>
</div>

div p means "Select all <p> elements that are descendants of a <div>", e.g. both <p> elements would be selected.

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The difference is whether you want it to be the "immediate child" (>) of the parent, or allow for it to be the "immediate child", but also "grandchild" or "great-grandchild" (and so on) too ().

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With div>p you refer to all <p> that are directly childs of a <div>.

<div>
    <p>Selected!</p>
    <a><p>Not Selected</p></a>
</div>

With div p you refer to all <p> that are into a <div> no matter the depth

<div>
    <p>Selected!</p>
    <a><p>Selected!</p></a>
</div>
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