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I don't understand why a Perl constructor needs all this blessing, and why it is always done with a hash (it is possible to use other variable types, apparently).

How does it make any sense that a constructor would return a blessed reference to a hash when I create a new instance of a class? I could understand "return (this);" or something along those lines, but returning some other random variable just mystifies me (particularly when you are supposed to use a hash).

my ?var = new Test("foo");
package Test;
our $localvar;
sub new{
 localvar = $_[1];
}

OK, so I have this basic class. I can set a class variable when I initialize it and then later use it like $var::localvar. But to have this actually compile and work in Perl I need to add in the line "return bless {}, shift;"???

It seems that this hash is sort of used as the instance of that class, with the methods being rather static. But you can still have class variables. It sounds like you are just linking a data object to a list of methods that take that object as a argument. But I am not sure why every tutorial would imply that you always use a hash if that was all that was happening. And I am confused why you have both this hash and any "our"s you declared in the class, they seem like mutually exclusive concepts?

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1  
Hobbs' answer below is excellent, but I'd also recommend foregoing the bolted-on object system in Perl 5 and using Moose. –  Jack Maney Feb 16 '13 at 4:22
2  
While using Moose is great, it's important to understand how the underlying object system works first, so that you know what problems Moose solves. Otherwise it's like trying to do Calculus without learning Algebra. –  friedo Feb 16 '13 at 5:41
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It's also worth checking out Object Oriented Fundamentals in the perlootut manpage, which is more recent than a lot of Perl OO stuff out there on the tubes. –  friedo Feb 16 '13 at 5:43
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1. $Test::localvar is not a class variable, it is a package variable, a kind of global. 2. You cannot use $var to get at $Test::localvar by name. 3. Most of your questions are answered by an introduction to object-oriented programming; you will likely be better served by buying a book. 4. The questions not covered by an introductory OOP text are covered by an introductory Perl text; I recommend you get one of those as well. –  darch Feb 16 '13 at 21:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 15 down vote accepted

It sounds like you are just linking a data object to a list of methods that take that object as a argument.

That's exactly what OO is, yes. The thing you return from the constructor is the instance. Unlike some other languages where the language creates a new "object instance" behind the scenes, and your constructor is just in charge of filling in slots, in Perl your constructor method gets to do the entire job. {} creates a reference to a new anonymous hash which will become the storage for the object, and bless is what actually turns that reference into an object, by tagging it with your class name.

But I am not sure why every tutorial would imply that you always use a hash if that was all that was happening.

A class can be any kind of reference, but a hash reference is the most useful and convenient, because hashes have named slots, so you can refer to your object's properties by name. There are examples out there of globref objects (filehandles and sockets), arrayref objects (rare, usually used for objects with only a few fields when the author is very concerned about speed and memory usage), and scalarref objects (often used to encapsulate a pointer returned by some C library). But hashref objects are "standard".

I can set a class variable when I initialize it and then later use it like ?var::localvar.

But why would you? Class variables are almost entirely useless, and there's no reason to bother with them until you have a grasp on more basic, and useful things.

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But why are class variables useless? And if I understand correctly. I could use a scalar instead of the hash and create a somewhat normal OO Java/C++ style class? Except I would have the ability to store one extra scalar with the instance? Why would I not what to do it that way? –  Jonathon Wisnoski Feb 16 '13 at 15:06
    
@JonathonWisnoski class variables are per-class. If you used a scalarref object, where would you store instance members? –  hobbs Feb 16 '13 at 22:07
    
Oh, well that explains a lot. This makes way more sense with that information. SO everything declared in the package is static, and the blessed variable that is returned is the entire instance. –  Jonathon Wisnoski Feb 16 '13 at 22:57

How does it make any sense that a constructor would return a blessed reference to a hash when I create a new instance of a class?

Well, it would be rather useless constructor if you didn't return the object you've created.

I could understand "return (this);" or something along those lines

Then what's the confusion? That's exactly what you should be returning. (Except the convention is to call it $self.)

sub new {
    my ($class, ...) = @_;
    my $self = bless({}, $class);  # Or: my $self = $class->SUPER::new(...);
    $self->{attribute1} = ...;
    $self->{attribute2} = ...;
    return $self;
}

It seems that this hash is sort of used as the instance of that class,

The blessed hash is the instance of that class aka the object.


Questions from the comments

Why do I have to [do my $self = bless({}, $class);] instead of just referencing the class instance. Like: $self = bless($class)

This code you suggest does not refer any class instance. It fact, this code you suggest doesn't even create one.

{} allocates a variable and bless associates it with a class. Two necessary steps in the creation of an object.

By having the two separate, you have the option of using different base variables for your object. For example, IO::Socket::INET uses a glob instead of a hash.

But most objects anyone would make would have no use for a hash in my opinion. A hash is a pretty specific data structure that is not needed or helpful for 99% of coding.

The point isn't to use a hash table; it's to use an associative array (where each element is an attribute).

Associative arrays (hash tables or otherwise) are both "needed and helpful" in far far more than 1% of coding.

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But most objects anyone would make would have no use for a hash in my opinion. A hash is a pretty specific data structure that is not needed or helpful for 99% of coding. It is awesome sometimes, but I cannot conceive of why it would be standard practice for all classes. And why you would not just store the hash as a our in the class and return a blessed scalar reference. –  Jonathon Wisnoski Feb 16 '13 at 15:07
    
Yes, but $self is not just the instance, but a variable as well. Why do I have to append a class instance onto a variable, instead of just referencing the class instance. Like: $self = bless($class);# where the value of self is a reference to this class instance. –  Jonathon Wisnoski Feb 16 '13 at 15:15
    
@Jonathon It seems your fundamental confusion is about what "hash" means in Perl. The short answer is that it is the name of Perl's general-purpose associative array. Refer to perldata. –  darch Feb 16 '13 at 21:17
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@Jonathon Wisnoski, Updated my answer with the answers to the question you asked in the comments. –  ikegami Feb 16 '13 at 23:46
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@JonathonWisnoski Very nearly every single time I ever make an object whose underlying representation is not a hash, I inevitably end up reneging on its implementation later and rewriting it as a hash. A hash is simply a general purpose struct-like container. Don’t get hung up on its name of “hash”. It’s simply the way you have an aggregate with named subfields in it. –  tchrist Feb 18 '13 at 6:04

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