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I'm very confused about the new async stuff. I have a portable library implementing my model with some classes with virtual functions I hope to use in ASP .NET, WPF, Windows Store, Silverlight 5, and Windows Phone 8. They might target WCF functionality, CSharp SQLite, or be overridden in platform-specific libraries for local file stuff.

How do I set it up now that synchronous programming is frowned upon in the Windows Store world? I tried adding async keywords and so forth in the portable library for the virtual functions, but it says that I don't have the necessary frameworks. How can I reuse this library without rewriting it? Is OOP programming totally dead now?

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What is OOB programming? Is that a poor man's version of OOP? –  Robert Harvey Feb 16 '13 at 4:09
    
Anyway, the new async way doesn't change anything; you can still use your library as-is, especially if none of the calls take longer than 50 ms. That's Microsoft's metric, and only 10% of all calls in their framework meet that metric and are therefore written to be asynchronous. The remaining 90% are still good ole ordinary synchronous methods. –  Robert Harvey Feb 16 '13 at 4:12
    
Sorry, I meant OOP. The brain is pretty fried after 15 hours of programming. –  jtsoftware Feb 16 '13 at 5:12
    
To expand, I was happy before using a Thread to do the operation, and then (for Silverlight and WP) using Dispatch. What's the equivalent in Windows Store that doesn't break the performance? For example, say I have an event handler for a button click, is there a lambda expression I can use that will call the function that takes a long time, but still return from the event handler right away? –  jtsoftware Feb 16 '13 at 5:15

2 Answers 2

VS will happily allow async in portable libraries targeting .NET 4.5 and Windows Store. If you need other platforms (notably .NET 4.0 and Silverlight 5) then you need to install Microsoft.Bcl.Async.

If you need a reference, the source for my AsyncEx library is available; the core assembly is a portable library that depends on Microsoft.Bcl.Async.

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The way I'm addressing it is to use a helper class I adapted from a previous version. Basically:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using Windows.UI.Core;
using Windows.UI.Xaml;

namespace JTModelsWinStore.Local
{
    public delegate void UseDataDelegate(DataCoordinator data);
    public delegate bool GetDataDelegate(DataCoordinator data);

    public class DataCoordinator
    {
        public DependencyObject Consumer;
        public GetDataDelegate GetDataFunction;
        public UseDataDelegate UseDataFunction;
        public bool GetDataSucceeded;
        public Exception ErrorException;
        public string ErrorMessage;

        public DataCoordinator(
            DependencyObject consumer,
            GetDataDelegate getDataFunction,
            UseDataDelegate useDataFunction)
        {
            Consumer = consumer;
            GetDataFunction = getDataFunction;
            UseDataFunction = useDataFunction;
            GetDataSucceeded = false;
            ErrorException = null;
            ErrorMessage = null;
        }

        public Task GetDataAsync()
        {
            GetDataSucceeded = false;

            Task task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
            {
                if (GetDataFunction != null)
                {
                    try
                    {
                        GetDataSucceeded = GetDataFunction(this);
                    }
                    catch (Exception exception)
                    {
                        GetDataSucceeded = false;
                        ErrorException = exception;
                        ErrorMessage = exception.Message;
                    }
                }

                if (UseDataFunction != null)
                {
                    if (Consumer != null)
                    {
                        var ignored = Consumer.Dispatcher.RunAsync(CoreDispatcherPriority.Normal, () =>
                        {
                            UseDataFunction(this);
                        });
                    }
                    else
                        UseDataFunction(this);
                }
            });
            return task;
        }
    }
}

and then in the Windows store code:

private async void ItemView_ItemClick(object sender, ItemClickEventArgs e)
{
    DataCoordinator data = new DataCoordinator(this, Logon, LogonCompleted);
    await data.GetDataAsync();
}

private bool Logon(DataCoordinator data)
{
    LoggedOnUserID = ServiceClient.LogOn(UserName, Password);

    if (LoggedOnUserID == null)
    {
        UserName = "AnonymousUser";
        Password = "";

        if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(ServiceClient.ErrorMessage))
            data.ErrorMessage = "Log on failed.";

        return false;
    }

    if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(ServiceClient.ErrorMessage))
    {
        data.ErrorMessage = ServiceClient.ErrorMessage;
        return false;
    }

    return true;
}

private void LogonCompleted(DataCoordinator data)
{
    if (data.GetDataSucceeded && LoggedOnUserID != null)
        pageTitle.Text = "Logged On";
    else
        pageTitle.Text = "LogOn Failed";
}

I provide the helper with two functions, one for getting the data (slow), and one for doing something with the data in the UI. I know I could do it in two nested lambdas, but I like hiding the two lambdas, which is more comfortable for an old-timer like me.

Please do feel free to critique it, for others' benefit as well as my own.

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