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I would like the following code to produce 4 subplots of the same size with a common aspect ratio between the size of x-axis and y-axis set by me. Referring to the below example, I would like all of the subplots look exactly like the first one (upper left). What is wrong right now is that the size of the y-axis is correlated with its largest value. That is the behaviour I want to avoid. I would really appreciate any help. I've killed too much time looking for a solution :(

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

def main(): 

    fig = plt.figure(1, [5.5, 3])
    for i in range(1,5):
        fig.add_subplot(221+i-1, adjustable='box', aspect=1) 
        plt.plot(np.arange(0,(i)*4,i))

    plt.show()

if __name__ == "__main__": 
    main()

Surprisingly, matplotlib produces the right thing by default (picture below):

   import  matplotlib.pyplot as plt 
   import numpy as np 

   def main(): 
       fig = plt.figure(1, [5.5, 3]) 
       for i in range(1,5): 
           fig.add_subplot(221+i-1) 
            plt.plot(np.arange(0,(i)*4,i)) 
       plt.show() 

I just want to add to this an ability to control the aspect ratio between lengths of x and y-axes...

Here is what I am looking for:

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I can't quite tell what you want from your question.

Do you want all of the plots to have the same data limits?

If so, use shared axes (I'm using subplots here, but you can avoid it if you want to stick to matlab-style code):

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

fig, axes = plt.subplots(nrows=2, ncols=2, sharey=True, sharex=True)
for i, ax in enumerate(axes.flat, start=1):
    ax.set(aspect=1)
    ax.plot(np.arange(0, i * 4, i))

plt.show()

enter image description here

If you want them all to share their axes limits, but to have adjustable='box' (i.e. non-square axes boundaries), use adjustable='box-forced':

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

fig, axes = plt.subplots(nrows=2, ncols=2, sharey=True, sharex=True)
for i, ax in enumerate(axes.flat, start=1):
    ax.set(aspect=1, adjustable='box-forced', xticks=range(i))
    ax.plot(np.arange(0, i * 4, i))

plt.show()

enter image description here


Edit: Sorry, I'm still a bit confused. Do you want something like this?

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt 
import numpy as np 

fig, axes = plt.subplots(nrows=2, ncols=2)
for i, ax in enumerate(axes.flat, start=1):
    ax.set(adjustable='datalim', aspect=1)
    ax.plot(np.arange(0, i * 4, i))

plt.show()

enter image description here


Okay, I think I finally understand your question. We both meant entirely different things by "aspect ratio".

In matplotlib, the aspect ratio of the plot refers to the relative scales of the data limits. In other words, if the aspect ratio of the plot is 1, a line with a slope of one will appear at 45 degrees. You were assuming that the aspect ratio applied to the outline of the axes and not the data plotted on the axes.

You just want the outline of the subplots to be square. (In which case, they all have different aspect ratios, as defined by matplotlib.)

In that case, you need a square figure. (There are other ways, but just making a square figure is far simpler. Matplotlib axes fill up a space that is proportional to the size of the figure they're in.)

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt 
import numpy as np 

# The key here is the figsize (it needs to be square). The position and size of
# axes in matplotlib are defined relative to the size of the figure.
fig, axes = plt.subplots(nrows=2, ncols=2, figsize=(8,8))

for i, ax in enumerate(axes.flat, start=1):
    ax.plot(np.arange(0, i * 4, i))

# By default, subplots leave a bit of room for tick labels on the left.
# We'll remove it so that the axes are perfectly square.
fig.subplots_adjust(left=0.1)

plt.show()

enter image description here

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Hi Joe! Thanks for the attention to my question. I am sorry for the confusion. Neither of your 2 options provides exactly what I am looking for. The first option is the closest though. It would be perfect if each one of subplots had its own limit of y-axis. That is what matplotlib does automatically. For instance, the following: (in the next message) produces the look that I want, but I would also like to control the aspect ratio of those subplots (one aspect ratio for all of them) –  user2077647 Feb 16 '13 at 19:38
    
code: import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np def main(): fig = plt.figure(1, [5.5, 3]) for i in range(1,5): fig.add_subplot(221+i-1) plt.plot(np.arange(0,(i)*4,i)) plt.show() –  user2077647 Feb 16 '13 at 19:41
    
I have added the picture this code produces in my original question –  user2077647 Feb 16 '13 at 19:45
    
Hi Joe, almost there! This is perfect except I would like all of the suplots have the x-axes limits to be from 0 to 3. That picture I included in the original question is everything I want but with wrong aspect ratio between axes. So right now it is something like 1/2 but I am looking for 1/1. –  user2077647 Feb 17 '13 at 19:18
    
Sorry, I'm still confused... The aspect ratio can't be constant if neither the limits or size of the axes change. You seem to be asking for plots that are the exact same size, have the same aspect ratio, the same x-axis limits, but different y-axis limits. That's impossible, by definition. I think I'm just misunderstanding your question... –  Joe Kington Feb 17 '13 at 23:58

Combing the answer of Joe Kington with new pythonic style for shared axes square subplots in matplotlib? and another post that I am afraid I cannot find it again, I made a code for precisely setting the ratio of the box to a given value.

Let desired_box_ratioN indicate the desired ratio between y and x sides of the box. temp_inverse_axis_ratioN is the ratio between x and y sides of the current plot; since 'aspect' is the ratio between y and x scale (and not axes), we need to set aspect to desired_box_ratioN * temp_inverse_axis_ratioN.

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

fig, axes = plt.subplots(nrows=2, ncols=2)

desired_box_ratioN = 1
for i, ax in enumerate(axes.flat, start=1):
    ax.plot(np.arange(0, i * 4, i))
    temp_inverse_axis_ratioN = abs( (ax.get_xlim()[1] - ax.get_xlim()[0])/(ax.get_ylim()[1] - ax.get_ylim()[0]) )
    ax.set(aspect = desired_box_ratioN * temp_inverse_axis_ratioN, adjustable='box-forced')

plt.show()
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