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So I have this, and if I comment out the bottom part, from int count = 0; to return 0; it will print, but in this case, nothing prints out. Even adding cout << "Test" in the beginning does nothing. It all compiles fine though.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <cctype>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    string text = "Smith, where Jones had had \"had had\", had had \"had\". \"Had had\" had had the examiners' approval.";

    string search = "had";

    int length = (int) text.length();

    for(int i = 0; i < length; i++)
    {
        text [i] = tolower(text [i]);
    }

    cout << text;

    int count = 0;
    for (int index = 0; (index = text.find(search)) != string::npos; index += search.length()) {
        count++;
        }

    cout << "There are " << count << " occurences of \"" << search << "\".\n"; 
    return 0;
}
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closed as too localized by WhozCraig, Mat, Sylvain Defresne, Mario, wtsang02 Feb 16 '13 at 19:46

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2  
Your last for loop is an infinite loop because search is always found in text. –  Meysam Feb 16 '13 at 5:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Compile it with g++ -g a.cpp then run it with gdb, you'll find that it's in an infinite loop.

What is pointed out in @xymostech 's answer is correct though. Although if the loop does end, the buffer will be flushed before the code ends.

Your pattern is always found in the string and therefore the text.find(search) never returns string::npos

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Your first loop is fine, but your second loop gets stuck at index 19, because you're always searching from the beginning of text.

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