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Having some problems implementing quicksort in java. I get a stackoverflow error when I run this program and I'm not exactly sure why. If anyone can point out the error, it would be great.

si is the starting index. ei is the ending index.

public static void qsort(int[] a, int si, int ei){

    //base case
    if(ei<=si || si>=ei){}


    else{ 
        int pivot = a[si]; 
        int length = ei - si + 1; 
        int i = si+1; int tmp; 

        //partition array 
        for(int j = si+1; j<length; j++){
            if(pivot > a[j]){
                tmp = a[j]; 
                a[j] = a[i]; 
                a[i] = tmp; 

                i++; 
            }
        }

        //put pivot in right position
        a[si] = a[i-1]; 
        a[i-1] = pivot; 

        //call qsort on right and left sides of pivot
        qsort(a, 0, i-2); 
        qsort(a, i, a.length-1); 
    }
}
share|improve this question
4  
Which line throws the exception? – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Feb 16 '13 at 5:36
    
the last two lines. the two that call quicksort on the right and left sides of pivot. – Shaayaan Sayed Feb 16 '13 at 5:38
    
The base case looks pretty standard, if the subarray size is 0 or 1. – bdares Feb 16 '13 at 5:39
3  
The right and left side of the or condition look to be one and the same thing tho. ei <= si is logically the exact same as si >= ei. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Feb 16 '13 at 5:41
    
Show us the callsite. – Keith Randall Feb 16 '13 at 5:46
up vote 5 down vote accepted

First you should fix the bounds of the qsort recursive call as suggested by Keith, since otherwise you're always sorting the whole array over and over again. The you must adjust your partition loop: j is an index, going from the beginning of the subarray to the end of it (including the last element). So you must loop from si + 1 to ei (including ei).

So this is the corrected code. I ran a few test cases and it seems to sort just fine.

    public static void qsort(int[] a, int si, int ei){
    //base case
    if(ei<=si || si>=ei){}

    else{ 
        int pivot = a[si]; 
        int i = si+1; int tmp; 

        //partition array 
        for(int j = si+1; j<= ei; j++){
            if(pivot > a[j]){
                tmp = a[j]; 
                a[j] = a[i]; 
                a[i] = tmp; 

                i++; 
            }
        }

        //put pivot in right position
        a[si] = a[i-1]; 
        a[i-1] = pivot; 

        //call qsort on right and left sides of pivot
        qsort(a, si, i-2); 
        qsort(a, i, ei); 
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the help. – Shaayaan Sayed Feb 16 '13 at 19:14

You might have an unbounded recursion bug on your hands. Not sure from my quick scan of it, but...

Even if you don't, you're still going to use lots of stack with this implementation. Enough to cause a stack overflow. What happens if you call it with 1 million items that are already sorted? You'll partition them into 1 and 999,999 items, then recurse. So you'll need 1 million stack frames to make this work.

There are lots of ways to solve this, including recursing on the smaller of the two ranges and iterating on the larger of the two, or implementing the stack yourself in a heap datastructure, etc. You probably want to do even better than that, though, as the deep stack also means you're blowing past the O(n lg n) sorting bound.

p.s. the bug is here:

qsort(a, 0, i-2); 
qsort(a, i, a.length-1); 

should be

qsort(a, si, i-2);
qsort(a, i, ei);
share|improve this answer
    
that's not the problem: I just ran this code with 14 items: stackoverflow... – Mitch Wheat Feb 16 '13 at 5:53
    
Still not solved: can I suggest you actually run the code you are suggesting... – Mitch Wheat Feb 16 '13 at 5:57
    
@MitchWheat: so perhaps what I should have said is "a bug", not "the bug". – Keith Randall Feb 16 '13 at 6:05
    
Call me old fashioned but I thought the point of an answer was to answer the question fully? – Mitch Wheat Feb 16 '13 at 6:06
    
@MitchWheat: My fix solves the stack overflow for the one example I tried. I'm not going to exhaustively test his code for him to find any other bug which might be there. – Keith Randall Feb 16 '13 at 6:10

You can try this:

public void sort(int[] A) {
        if (A == null || A.length == 0)
            return;
        quicksort(A, 0, A.length - 1);
    }

    public void quicksort(int[] A, int left, int right) {
        int pivot = A[left + (right - left) / 2];
        int i = left;
        int j = right;
        while (i <= j) {
            while (A[i] < pivot) {
                i++;
            }
            while (A[j] > pivot) {
                j--;
            }
            if (i <= j) {
                exchange(i, j);
                i++;
                j--;
            }
        }

        if(left < j)
            quicksort(A,left,j);
        if(i < right)
            quicksort(A,i,right);
    }

    public void exchange(int i, int j){
        int temp=A[i];
        A[i]=A[j];
        A[j]=temp;
    }

    public String toString() {
        String s = "";
        s += "[" + A[0];
        for (int i = 1; i < A.length; i++) {
            s += ", " + A[i];
        }
        s += "]";
        return s;
    }

Source: Code 2 Learn: Quick Sort Algorithm Tutorial

share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand the 2 lines after the outermost while loop. Why do we have to do this? if(left < j) and if(i < right) – Ayusman Aug 18 '15 at 11:56
import java.util.Arrays;


public class QuickSort {


    public static int pivot(int[] a, int lo, int hi){
        int mid = (lo+hi)/2;
        int pivot = a[lo] + a[hi] + a[mid] - Math.min(Math.min(a[lo], a[hi]), a[mid]) - Math.max(Math.max(a[lo], a[hi]), a[mid]);

        if(pivot == a[lo])
            return lo;
        else if(pivot == a[hi])
            return hi;
        return mid;
    }

    public static int partition(int[] a, int lo, int hi){

        int k = pivot(a, lo, hi);
        //System.out.println(k);
        swap(a, lo, k);
        //System.out.println(a);
        int j = hi + 1;
        int i = lo;
        while(true){

            while(a[lo] < a[--j])
                if(j==lo)   break;

            while(a[++i] < a[lo])
                if(i==hi) break;

            if(i >= j)  break;
            swap(a, i, j);
        }
        swap(a, lo, j);
        return j;
    }

    public static void sort(int[] a, int lo, int hi){
        if(hi<=lo)  return;
        int p = partition(a, lo, hi);
        sort(a, lo, p-1);
        sort(a, p+1, hi);
    }

    public static void swap(int[] a, int b, int c){
        int swap = a[b];
        a[b] = a[c];
        a[c] = swap;
    }

    public static void sort(int[] a){
        sort(a, 0, a.length - 1);
        System.out.print(Arrays.toString(a));
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int[] arr = {5,8,6,4,2,9,7,5,9,4,7,6,2,8,7,5,6};
        sort(arr);
    }
}

Try this. It will work for sure.

share|improve this answer

//Just implemented the tester class for this and it'll work

public int[] sort(int[] A, int from, int to ){

if(from<to){
    int pivot=partition(A,from,to);
    if(pivot>1)
        sort(A,from, pivot-1);

    if(pivot+1<to)
        sort(A, pivot+1, to);


}

return array;

}

public int partition(int A[ ], int from, int to){

while(from < to){
    int pivot=A[from];

    while(A[from]<pivot)
        from++;

    while(A[to]>pivot)
        to--;


    if(from<to)   
        swap(A,to,from);



}
    return to;
}

private void swap(int A[], int i, int j){
    int temp = A[i];
    A[i] = A[j];
    A[j] = temp;}
share|improve this answer

Quicksort is slightly sensitive to input that happens to be in the right order, in which case it can skip some swaps. Mergesort doesn't have any such optimizations, which also makes Quicksort a bit faster compared to Mergesort.

Why Quick sort is better than Merge sort

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