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I want to download and manipulate a csv file when I open a historical stock quotes from Yahoo finance.

A brief glimpse of how the csv file looks like:

Date,Open,High,Low,Close,Volume,Adj Close
2012-11-30,691.31,699.22,685.69,698.37,3163600,698.37
2012-11-29,687.78,693.90,682.00,691.89,2776500,691.89
2012-11-28,668.01,684.91,663.89,683.67,3042000,683.67

I want to create a code that erases the word "open, High, Low, Close, Volume, Adj" and the data underneath it, and also add two new columns, giving me:

Date        Close    [Insert new column here] [Another column]
2012-11-30  698.37      ---some data----       ---some data----
2012-11-29  691.89      ---some data----       ---some data----
2012-11-28  683.67      ---some data----       ---some data----

I am a beginner in using Python, so I am having a bit of trouble writing this code. If someone can help me out, I'd appreciate it very much.

So far, this is what I have, though it doesn't clearly work the way I want it to.

def _download_url(url):
    response = None
    try:
        response = urllib.request.urlopen(url)
        content_bytes=response.read()
        content_string=content_bytes.decode(encoding='utf-8')
        data = io.StringIO(content_string)
        mycsv=csv.reader(data)
        for row in mycsv:
            if row:
                print(row[0],row[6])

This code prints out (a brief glimpse):

Date Adj Close
2012-11-30 698.37
2012-11-29 691.89
2012-11-28 683.67
2012-11-27 670.71

It's kind of what I want, but I want to erase "Adj" and also add two new columns. thank you!

share|improve this question

Before creating data, adjust content_string to remove 'Adj ':

content_string=content_bytes.decode(encoding='utf-8')
content_string = content_string.replace('Adj ', '')
data = io.StringIO(content_string)

As for adding columns, it is up to you to do so in the print statement.

share|improve this answer

I happen to be a huge fan of the DictReader class in csv, since it takes all the guesswork out of parsing csvs (no more indices!):

mycsv = csv.DictReader(data)
print('{:<11} {:<8} {:<12} {:<12}'.format('Date', 'Close', 'Col1', 'Col2'))
for row in mycsv:
    print('{:<11} {:<8} {:<12} {:<12}'.format(row['Date'], row['Adj Close'], '123', '456')

The first print prints out the header row, and the second print prints out each row (note that DictReader will consume the header row in the CSV for you). The {:<11} {:<8} {:<12} {:<12} formats your data with neat fixed columns of the specified sizes.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried doing this but how do i add different data underneath the new column I just added? '123' and '456' seems to repeat underneath those columns but I want it to be different values. – Kara Feb 18 '13 at 7:05
    
Well, you have to replace the 123 and 456 in the print with the data you want, of course! – nneonneo Feb 18 '13 at 9:00
    
No, I am talking about when I replace '123' and '456' in the print statement, it's repeating the same values underneath each column '123 123 123' when i want like '123' '345' '567'. It's just repeating – Kara Feb 18 '13 at 19:15
    
...replace it with the calculation you want then. – nneonneo Feb 18 '13 at 19:18

If you're not already wedded to your design, I'd recommend looking at pandas. It makes stuff like this a lot easier than it would otherwise be. Getting the data:

>>> from pandas.io.data import DataReader
>>> apple = DataReader("AAPL",  "yahoo")
>>> apple
<class 'pandas.core.frame.DataFrame'>
DatetimeIndex: 786 entries, 2010-01-04 00:00:00 to 2013-02-15 00:00:00
Data columns:
Open         786  non-null values
High         786  non-null values
Low          786  non-null values
Close        786  non-null values
Volume       786  non-null values
Adj Close    786  non-null values
dtypes: float64(5), int64(1)
>>> apple[:5]
              Open    High     Low   Close    Volume  Adj Close
Date                                                           
2010-01-04  213.43  214.50  212.38  214.01  17633200     210.90
2010-01-05  214.60  215.59  213.25  214.38  21496600     211.26
2010-01-06  214.38  215.23  210.75  210.97  19720000     207.90
2010-01-07  211.75  212.00  209.05  210.58  17040400     207.52
2010-01-08  210.30  212.00  209.06  211.98  15986100     208.90

Adding a new column:

>>> apple["new_column"] = apple["Open"]/apple["Volume"]**0.3 + 5
>>> apple[:5]
              Open    High     Low   Close    Volume  Adj Close  new_column
Date                                                                       
2010-01-04  213.43  214.50  212.38  214.01  17633200     210.90    6.430066
2010-01-05  214.60  215.59  213.25  214.38  21496600     211.26    6.354936
2010-01-06  214.38  215.23  210.75  210.97  19720000     207.90    6.389032
2010-01-07  211.75  212.00  209.05  210.58  17040400     207.52    6.433440
2010-01-08  210.30  212.00  209.06  211.98  15986100     208.90    6.451164

Choosing only the columns we want:

>>> new = apple[["Close", "new_column"]]
>>> new[:5]
             Close  new_column
Date                          
2010-01-04  214.01    6.430066
2010-01-05  214.38    6.354936
2010-01-06  210.97    6.389032
2010-01-07  210.58    6.433440
2010-01-08  211.98    6.451164

Et cetera.

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