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I've read tons of documentation related to this problem but I still can't get all the pieces together, so I'd like to ask a couple of questions.

  1. First of all I'll describe briefly the authentication procedure as I understand it, as I may be mistaken in that regard: A client starts a connection, which a server responds to with a combination of public key, some metadata and digital signature of a trusted authority. Then the client takes the decision if she trusts the server, encrypts some random session key with the public key and sends it back. This session key can be decrypted only with private key stored on the server. Server does this and then the HTTPS session begins.

  2. So, if I'm correct above, the question is how the man-in-the-middle attack can occur in such scenario? I mean, even if somebody intercepts the server (e.g. www.server.com) response with public key and has some means to make me think that he is www.server.com, he still wouldn't be able to decrypt my session key without the private key.

  3. Speaking about the mutual authentication, is it all about the server confidence about the client identity? I mean, the client can already be sure that she is communicating with the right server, but now the server wants to find out who the client is, right?

  4. And the last question is about the alternative to the mutual authentication. If I act as a client in the situation described, what if I send a login/password in the HTTP header after the SSL session is established? As I see it, this information can't be intercepted because the connection is already secured and the server can rely on it for my identification. Am I wrong? What are the downsides of such an approach compared with mutual authentication (only security issues are important, not the implementation complexity)?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 36 down vote accepted

Man-in-the-middle attacks on SSL are really only possible if one of SSL's preconditions is broken, here are some examples;

  • The server key has been stolen - means the attacker can appear to be the server, and there is no way for the client to know.

  • The client trusts an untrustworthy CA (or one that has had it's root key stolen) - whoever holds a trusted CA key can generate a certificate pretending to be the server and the client will trust it. With the number of CAs pre-existing in browsers today, this may be a real problem. This means that the server certificate would appear to change to another valid one, which is something most clients will hide from you.

  • The client doesn't bother to validate the certificate correctly against its list of trusted CA's - anyone can create a CA. With no validation, "Ben's Cars and Certificates" will appear to be just as valid as Verisign.

  • The client has been attacked and a fake CA has been injected in his trusted root authorities - allows the attacker to generate any cert he likes, and the client will trust it. Malware tends to do this to for example redirect you to fake banking sites.

Especially #2 is rather nasty, even if you pay for a highly trusted certificate, your site will not be in any way locked to that certificate, you have to trust all CAs in the client's browser since any of them can generate a fake cert for your site that is just as valid. It also does not require access to either the server or the client.

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There are also tools like sslstrip, which will attempt to transparently rewrite https links into http links. –  Mike Feb 16 '13 at 7:05
    
Thank you, your answer has added me some confidence :) –  Vadim Chekry Feb 16 '13 at 7:22
    
Another point about certificate verification is that the client needs to verify the host name. It's not good enough to check that the cert is genuine, it has to be issue to the entity you want to talk to (see here and here). As for sslstrip, it's ultimately up to the user to check they want to use SSL/TLS unfortunately (although HSTS can help). –  Bruno Feb 16 '13 at 13:07
    
@Bruno Right, fixed, thanks :) –  Joachim Isaksson Feb 16 '13 at 16:52
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@Remover Not really... #1 is the private key on the server, paired with the genuine public key. In this scenario you'd talk to the real server but someone else could decrypt the traffic by being in the middle. They can't modify the certificate. #2 involves sending an entirely different certificate, issued by a "trusted" CA that will appear to be the legitimate to the client. The attacker can then proxy requests on your behalf and see messages that way. Both result in a compromise but #1 is under your control. #2, unfortunately, is not. –  Basic Apr 3 at 15:17

First of all I'll describe briefly the authentification procedure as I understand it, maybe I'm mistaken on that step. So, a client starts a connection and a server responds it with combination of public key, some metadata and digital signature of a trusted authority.

The server responds with an X.509 certificate chain and a digital signature signed with its own private key.

Then the client takes the decision if she trusts the server

Correct.

encrypts some random session key with the public key and sends it back.

No. The client and server engage in a mutual session key generation process whereby the session key itself is never transmitted at all.

This session key can be decrypted only with private key stored on the server.

No.

Server does this

No.

and then the HTTPS session begins.

The TLS/SSL session begins, but there are more steps first.

So, if I'm correct above, the question is how does the man-in-the-middle attack can occur in such scenario?

By masquerading as the server and acting as the SSL endpoint. The client would have to omit any authorization step. Sadly the only authorization step in most HTTPS sessions is a hostname check.

I mean that even if somebody intercepts the server (e.g. www.server.com) response with public key and then with some means let me think that he is www.server.com, he still wouldn't be able to decrypt my session key without the private key.

See above. There is no session key to decrypt. The SSL connection itself is secure, it's who you're talking to that may not be secure.

Speaking about the mutual authentication, is it all about the server confidence about the client identity? I mean, that the client can already be sure that she is communicating with the right server, but now the server wants to find out who is the client, right?

Correct.

And the last question is about the alternative to the mutual authentication. If I act as a client in the situation described, what if I send a login/password in the HTTP header after the SSL session is established? As I see, this information can't be intercepted because the connection is already secured and the server can rely on it for my identification. Am I wrong?

No.

What are the downsides of such approach comparing with mutual authentication (only security issues are important, not the implementation complexity)?

It's only as secure as the username/password, which are a lot easier to leak than a private key.

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Thank you for your explanation. The only thing I didn't get is why you said a client doesn't send a session key to a server? Well, maybe I've used wrong terminology, here this piece of data is called "pre-master secret", but anyway, isn't it sent by the client and it is decrypted with the server private key? –  Vadim Chekry Feb 17 '13 at 7:30
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@VadimChekry The pre-master secret is not the session key. It is one of several pieces of data used to generate the session key, independently at both ends. The process is described in RFC 2246. –  EJP Feb 17 '13 at 11:07
    
Thanks @EJP. I am out of my depth, but from this answer, can I assume that if you use the IP address to connect, you are not vulnerable to MITM attacks? It seems from everything I can find that MITM attacks depend on the mapping of a domain name to an illegitimate IP address. Apologies this is a dumb question to most people on this area of SO! –  Chris Oct 15 '14 at 11:04
  1. Correct
  2. Not so correct. In that kind of attack the itermediate server gets your request and send that to destination in behalf of you. and then respond to you with the result. Actually it is man-in-the-middle server which makes secure connection with you not actual server you are intended to comunicate. that is why you MUST always check the certicate is valid and trusted.
  3. could be correct
  4. If you are sure the secured connection is trusted then is would b safe to send username/password.
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About 2 - I'm assuming that the client is thoroughly checking the metadata sent by the server during the procedure of connection establishment and that the client doesn't trust to ALL certificates. So wouldn't such scenario be possible if - a) a client is not doing what I said above, or b) a man-in-the-middle has got somewhere a certificate signed by trusted CA? –  Vadim Chekry Feb 16 '13 at 6:30
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It happens very rare that the intermediate server sends valid certificate, last year it happend with Comodo CA if I remember well. But normally if it is a trusted connection then it is completely secure. –  Boynux Feb 16 '13 at 7:03

Everything you have said is correct. The point of CAs is to defeat a man-in-the-middle attack -- everything else is done by SSL itself. Client authentication is an alternative to a username and password scheme.

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Thank you for your reply –  Vadim Chekry Feb 16 '13 at 8:30
    
He's not correct about the session key. –  EJP Jun 15 '13 at 0:50
    
@EJP: True. It's pretty minor, but it's certainly better to be correct than slightly incorrect. –  David Schwartz Jun 15 '13 at 0:51

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