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Suppose I have a database table with two fields, "foo" and "bar". Neither of them are unique, but each of them are indexed. However, rather than being indexed together, they each have a separate index.

Now suppose I perform a query such as SELECT * FROM sometable WHERE foo='hello' AND bar='world'; My table a huge number of rows for which foo is 'hello' and a small number of rows for which bar is 'world'.

So the most efficient thing for the database server to do under the hood is use the bar index to find all fields where bar is 'world', then return only those rows for which foo is 'hello'. This is O(n) where n is the number of rows where bar is 'world'.

However, I imagine it's possible that the process would happen in reverse, where the fo index was used and the results searched. This would be O(m) where m is the number of rows where foo is 'hello'.

So is Oracle smart enough to search efficiently here? What about other databases? Or is there some way I can tell it in my query to search in the proper order? Perhaps by putting bar='world' first in the WHERE clause?

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9 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Oracle will almost certainly use the most selective index to drive the query, and you can check that with the explain plan.

Furthermore, Oracle can combine the use of both indexes in a couple of ways -- it can convert btree indexes to bitmaps and perform a bitmap ANd operation on them, or it can perform a hash join on the rowid's returned by the two indexes.

One important consideration here might be any correlation between the values being queried. If foo='hello' accounts for 80% of values in the table and bar='world' accounts for 10%, then Oracle is going to estimate that the query will return 0.8*0.1= 8% of the table rows. However this may not be correct - the query may actually return 10% of the rwos or even 0% of the rows depending on how correlated the values are. Now, depending on the distribution of those rows throughout the table it may not be efficient to use an index to find them. You may still need to access (say) 70% or the table blocks to retrieve the required rows (google for "clustering factor"), in which case Oracle is going to perform a ful table scan if it gets the estimation correct.

In 11g you can collect multicolumn statistics to help with this situation I believe. In 9i and 10g you can use dynamic sampling to get a very good estimation of the number of rows to be retrieved.

To get the execution plan do this:

explain plan for
SELECT *
FROM   sometable
WHERE  foo='hello' AND bar='world'
/
select * from table(dbms_xplan.display)
/

Contrast that with:

explain plan for
SELECT /*+ dynamic_sampling(4) */
       *
FROM   sometable
WHERE  foo='hello' AND bar='world'
/
select * from table(dbms_xplan.display)
/
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With all respect David, looking at Eli's comments below, the answer to his question is "use bitmaps". –  Nick Pierpoint Oct 7 '08 at 20:00
1  
Bitmap indexes are certainly efficient at this type of query, but they are really unfriendly in an OLTP environments. It's also worth knowing that a pair of btree indexes can be combined in a bitmap operation, although there's a much bigger overhead on this. –  David Aldridge Oct 8 '08 at 16:18
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Yes, you can give "hints" with the query to Oracle. These hints are disguised as comments ("/* HINT */") to the database and are mainly vendor specific. So one hint for one database will not work on an other database.

I would use index hints here, the first hint for the small table. See here.

On the other hand, if you often search over these two fields, why not create an index on these two? I do not have the right syntax, but it would be something like

CREATE INDEX IX_BAR_AND_FOO on sometable(bar,foo);

This way data retrieval should be pretty fast. And in case the concatenation is unique hten you simply create a unique index which should be lightning fast.

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Informix has these hint clauses as well. Most of the time you're not going help the optimizer this way -- it's quite good at what it does. –  hometoast Sep 29 '08 at 15:16
    
Unfortunately, I have a table with lots of columns each with their own index. Users can query any combination of fields, so I can't efficiently create indexes on each field combination. But if I did only have two fields needing indexes, I'd completely agree with your suggestion to use two indexes. –  Eli Courtwright Sep 29 '08 at 15:51
    
Do not even try to apologize : ) . Oracle will most probably use the "most sensitive" in your case. Again, you must not rely on the optimization of Oracle alone. But, for one thing, updating the explain plan and trying to keep it up-to-date is a good idea, anyway. –  Georgi Sep 30 '08 at 0:11
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So is Oracle smart enough to search efficiently here?

The simple answer is "probably". There are lots'o' very bright people at each of the database vendors working on optimizing the query optimizer, so it's probably doing things that you haven't even thought of. And if you update the statistics, it'll probably do even more.

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First off, I'll assume that you are talking about nice, normal, standard b*-tree indexes. The answer for bitmap indexes is radically different. And there are lots of options for various types of indexes in Oracle that may or may not change the answer.

At a minimum, if the optimizer is able to determine the selectivity of a particular condition, it will use the more selective index (i.e. the index on bar). But if you have skewed data (there are N values in the column bar but the selectivity of any particular value is substantially more or less than 1/N of the data), you would need to have a histogram on the column in order to tell the optimizer which values are more or less likely. And if you are using bind variables (as all good OLTP developers should), depending on the Oracle version, you may have issues with bind variable peeking.

Potentially, Oracle could even do an on the fly conversion of the two b*-tree indexes to bitmaps and combine the bitmaps in order to use both indexes to find the rows it needs to retrieve. But this is a rather unusual query plan, particularly if there are only two columns where one column is highly selective.

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Points taken. one would think that the database optimizer would compare size by default. –  Mike Brown Sep 30 '08 at 0:06
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Eli,

In a comment you wrote:

Unfortunately, I have a table with lots of columns each with their own index. Users can query any combination of fields, so I can't efficiently create indexes on each field combination. But if I did only have two fields needing indexes, I'd completely agree with your suggestion to use two indexes. – Eli Courtwright (Sep 29 at 15:51)

This is actually rather crucial information. Sometimes programmers outsmart themselves when asking questions. They try to distill the question down to the seminal points but quite often over simplify and miss getting the best answer.

This scenario is precisely why bitmap indexes were invented -- to handle the times when unknown groups of columns would be used in a where clause.

Just in case someone says that BMIs are for low cardinality columns only and may not apply to your case. Low is probably not as small as you think. The only real issue is concurrency of DML to the table. Must be single threaded or rare for this to work.

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I read down all the comments and wondered why no one was saying this is exactly why bitmaps were invented. +1 –  Nick Pierpoint Oct 7 '08 at 19:58
    
Thanks for the info; I'd never even heard of bitmap indexes before, so I'll look into them. It may be too late to change our current index design on this project, but if we have performance problems then I'll come back to BMIs and definitely try using them on future projects. –  Eli Courtwright Oct 9 '08 at 12:51
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I'm sure you can also have Oracle display a query plan so you can see exactly which index is used first.

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The "Plan" is just that, what it plans to do first. There are times when that deviates from what actually happens. You need to generate a trace to get exactly what happened. –  Mark Brady Oct 7 '08 at 18:37
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You can provide hints as to which index to use. I'm not familiar with Oracle, but in Mysql you can use USE|IGNORE|FORCE_INDEX (see here for more details). For best performance though you should use a combined index.

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The best approach would be to add foo to bar's index, or add bar to foo's index (or both). If foo's index also contains an index on bar, that additional indexing level will not affect the utility of the foo index in any current uses of that index, nor will it appreciably affect the performance of maintaining that index, but it will give the database additional information to work with in optimizing queries such as in the example.

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Actually I concur with Jeffrey...in addition to what he said, having two seperate indices will affect your write speed (because the database has to update two indices on a write instead of one. –  Mike Brown Sep 29 '08 at 15:27
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It's better than that.

Index Seeks are always quicker than full table scans. So behind the scenes Oracle (and SQL server for that matter) will first locate the range of rows on both indices. It will then look at which range is shorter (seeing that it's an inner join), and it will iterate the shorter range to find the matches with the larger of the two.

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First, it is not true that index seeks are always faster than full table scans. In Oracle, multi-block reads for full table scans can be faster than single-block reads of indexes if you are retrieving more than a small fraction of the rows. –  Justin Cave Sep 29 '08 at 15:46
1  
Second, the Oracle optimizer will not scan the two indexes in order to determine which to use, it will use statistics in the data dictionary to determine which index is expected to be more selective. Those statistics will be influenced by histograms that define the selectivity of different values. –  Justin Cave Sep 29 '08 at 15:49
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