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Is this a bug in the python implementation in my system? I am running Python 2.7.3 on Ubuntu 12.04.

A = [(1,(1,2,3))]
A1 = filter(lambda (a,b): b, A)
A2 = filter(lambda ab: ab, A)
A1 == A2
>>>> True
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What did you expect? Both (1,(1,2,3)) and (1,2,3) are True. – Pavel Anossov Feb 16 '13 at 7:13
    
I'm not sure what you mean. Both 1 and 2 are 'True', yet 1 == 2 is False. Also, neither of those values is exactly 'True' – erjoalgo Feb 16 '13 at 7:17
    
Did you actually look up filter in the Python docs? To quote The Princess Bride, "you keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means." – Kyle Strand Feb 16 '13 at 7:19
    
You're filtering a one-element list by testing the entire element and its second subtuple. Both these tuples are truthish and do not get the element removed. The single-element list is returned unchanged. – Pavel Anossov Feb 16 '13 at 7:19
    
I knew that there was something absolutely trivial that I was missing. I completely confused 'filter' for map!! What a waste of a question. Thanks to all. Note: I do use filter and map and such functions heavily, it is not that I simply did not look at the docs. This was just a complete slip. – erjoalgo Feb 16 '13 at 7:22
up vote 2 down vote accepted

filter filters out arguments that when passed into the function, returns a False-ish value. Both (1, 2, 3) and (1, (1, 2, 3)) return True in a boolean context, and therefore remain in the returned list.

You want map instead.

A1 = map(lambda (a,b): b, A)
A2 = map(lambda ab: ab, A)

FYI, the follwing values are False-ish values, while everything else is True-ish:

0
None
False
''
[]
()
# and all other empty containers
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I knew that there was something absolutely trivial that I was missing. I completely confused 'filter' for map!! What a waste of a question. Thank you. – erjoalgo Feb 16 '13 at 7:19

It's not a bug. filter takes elements where your function returns True-y values.

In the first case, you unpack the tuple as 1 and (1,2,3) and you look at the second one ((1,2,3)) -- It's true (non-empty), so filter returns the whole thing.

In the second case, you look at the tuple (1,(1,2,3)). That's not empty either, so it returns the whole thing again.

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