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I think I understand strong and weak keywords well, but I don't understand how it's used in the code below. This code is from SDWebImage by Olivier Poitrey available on github. I understand strong and weak keywords as is described here: Explanation of strong and weak storage in iOS5

The code below uses __weak and __strong keywords in a way that is curious to me. It is not a child-parent relationship or delegate pattern as I am used to seeing weak used. However, I'm sure that this is a pattern that is used often, as I've seen it before in other code. It sets a __weak reference before a block that runs on another thread. Then, within the block, it sets the weak reference to a strong reference.

I am certain that this good and elegant code, so I'm trying to understand it. If "self" ceases to exist before the block runs, the weak self reference will zero out. When the block runs, the strong reference will be set to zero as well. Therefore, it will know to kill the rest of the operation since self doesn't exist anymore. Did I get this right?

Now, what would happen if we didn't use __weak and __strong keywords? What if we just checked inside the block whether self == nil. Would "self" never be nil since the block copies the entire tree?

Can someone help demystify this awesome piece of code? Can someone verify or repudiate my hypotheses?

- (void)setImageWithURL:(NSURL *)url placeholderImage:(UIImage *)placeholder options:(SDWebImageOptions)options progress:(SDWebImageDownloaderProgressBlock)progressBlock completed:(SDWebImageCompletedBlock)completedBlock;
{
    [self cancelCurrentImageLoad];

    self.image = placeholder;

    if (url)
    {
        __weak UIImageView *wself = self;
        id<SDWebImageOperation> operation = [SDWebImageManager.sharedManager downloadWithURL:url options:options progress:progressBlock completed:^(UIImage *image, NSError *error, SDImageCacheType cacheType, BOOL finished)
        {
            __strong UIImageView *sself = wself;
            if (!sself) return;
            if (image)
            {
                sself.image = image;
                [sself setNeedsLayout];
            }
            if (completedBlock && finished)
            {
                completedBlock(image, error, cacheType);
            }
        }];
        objc_setAssociatedObject(self, &operationKey, operation, OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN_NONATOMIC);
    }
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The downloadWithUrl: method might take a long time. In that time, the user might decide to navigate away, eliminating the need for the SDWebImage object. To facilitate early cleanup of the object, the outer self reference is weak. This way, downloadWithUrl won't prevent the SDWebImage from being deallocated.

Of course, if you actually want to work with self, you need a strong reference. So, the on-completion block of downloadWithUrl grabs a strong reference to self. If the object goes away in this time, sself will be nil. Otherwise, it will be a valid strong reference, indicating that the SDWebImage object is still around, and the object will finish its work at this time.

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Another fantastic answer. Thanks nneonneo. –  Edward Chin Feb 16 '13 at 7:59
    
It's more than just "To facilitate early cleanup of the object". It facilitates cleanup of the object at all -- otherwise there would be a retain cycle -- self retains operation via the associative reference. operation retains the block. If the block retained self it would be a cycle. –  newacct Dec 16 '13 at 10:46

I am certain that this good and elegant code, so I'm trying to understand it. If "self" ceases to exist before the block runs, the weak self reference will zero out. When the block runs, the strong reference will be set to zero as well. Therefore, it will know to kill the rest of the operation since self doesn't exist anymore. Did I get this right?

Nope, you're over thinking this quite a bit. The __weak storage qualifier is just that: a qualifier. Objects that are __weak are explicitly unretained, but they aren't just automatically set to nil if assigned from a strong variable. In fact, that would defeat the purpose of a weak variable!

Now, what would happen if we didn't use __weak and __strong keywords? What if we just checked inside the block whether self == nil. Would "self" never be nil since the block copies the entire tree?

The checking is actually unnecessary because the runtime resolves messages to nil to nil (nevertheless, it may be important to the implementation later on, who knows). You are spot on with this one: without that little "weak to strong" dance there, then self would be retained by the block, with the potential to create a pretty nasty retain cycle. Which is where I can start tying this all together:

Because we don't want the block to retain our variable, but we also want it to be strong inside the scope of the block so nothing weird happens, self is assigned to a weak pointer. When the block happens upon our weak pointer, it isn't allowed to retain it, so self's reference count stays the same, then once inside the block, we go right back to a strong self variable so the weak one is released, and we don't have to worry about it any more. Practically, this means we have a solid guarantee that self is either a value or nil throughout the entire execution of the block. Pretty neat, huh?

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Your last paragraph is very very helpful. Thank you CodaFi. –  Edward Chin Feb 16 '13 at 7:56
    
I don't understand this phrase: "...we go right back to a strong self variable so the weak one is released". Is sself there to create a strong reference to make sure wself will not be released in the middle of executing the block by another thread? –  Boon Dec 16 '13 at 2:52
    
Sort of. If you don't reassign to a strong variable in the block it may be released out from under us and set to nil in the middle of block execution. By assigning to strong you guarantee that self is either non-nil or nil throughout the entire execution duration of the block. –  CodaFi Dec 16 '13 at 3:21

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