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I have a small file:

    # Format
    # <iface_name>,<ip_addr>,<ip_netmask>,<broadcast>,<eth_addr>,<status>,<obtaining_method>

    eth0,192.168.0.11,255.255.255.0,192.168.0.255,4A:DD:00:00:05:00,up,static
    lv0,172.20.8.12,255.255.248.0,172.20.15.255,4A:DD:00:FF:15:01,down,static
    #lv0:0,172.20.16.12,255.255.248.0,172.20.23.255,4A:DD:00:FF:15:01,down,static
    #lv0:1,172.20.24.12,255.255.248.0,172.20.31.255,4A:DD:00:FF:15:01,down,static
    lv1,172.21.8.11,255.255.248.0,172.21.15.255,4A:DD:00:FF:15:02,down,dhcp
    #lv1:0,172.21.16.1,255.255.248.0,172.21.23.255,4A:DD:00:FF:15:02,down,static
    #lv1:1,172.21.24.1,255.255.248.0,172.21.31.255,4A:DD:00:FF:15:02,down,static
    mv0,10.100.0.1,255.255.255.0,10.100.0.255,40:FD:00:00:01:0A,up,static
    lp0,172.22.0.12,255.255.255.0,172.22.0.255,4A:DD:00:FF:15:04,down,static
    lp1,172.22.1.12,255.255.255.0,172.22.1.255,4A:DD:00:FF:15:05,down,static
    dummy0,192.168.111.100,255.255.255.0,192.168.111.255,00:00:00:00:00:00,down,static

I have an idea to take all interfaces parameters in one cycle and have made this expression:

    #!/bin/sh

    SPATH=/mnt/dcu/tmp/

    for INTERFACE in $(awk -F\, '/^[^#]/ {print $1}' $SPATH/ifaces); do
        INTERFACE_SETTINGS=$(awk -F\, '$1 ~ interface_name {print $2,$3,$4,$5,$6,$7}' interface_name=$INTERFACE $SPATH/ifaces)
        set $INTERFACE_SETTINGS
        IPADDR=$1
        NETMASK=$2
        BROADCAST=$3
        MACADDR=$4
        STATE=$5
        METHOD=$6

        sed -r -i -e "/$INTERFACE/s/^([^,]*,)([^,]*,)([^,]*,)([^,]*,)([^,]*,)([^,]*,)([^,]*)$/$INTERFACE,$IPADDR,$NETMASK,$BROADCAST,$MACADDR,$STATE,$METHOD/" /etc/network/ifaces
    done

but it do the following:

     # Format
     # <iface_name>,<ip_addr>,<ip_netmask>,<broadcast>,<eth_addr>,<status>,<obtaining_method>

     eth0,192.168.0.11,255.255.255.0,192.168.0.255,4A:DD:00:00:05:00,up,static
     lv0,172.20.8.12,255.255.248.0,172.20.15.255,4A:DD:00:FF:15:01,down,static
     lv0,172.20.8.12,255.255.248.0,172.20.15.255,4A:DD:00:FF:15:01,down,static
     lv0,172.20.8.12,255.255.248.0,172.20.15.255,4A:DD:00:FF:15:01,down,static
     lv1,172.21.8.11,255.255.248.0,172.21.15.255,4A:DD:00:FF:15:02,down,dhcp
     lv1,172.21.8.11,255.255.248.0,172.21.15.255,4A:DD:00:FF:15:02,down,dhcp
     lv1,172.21.8.11,255.255.248.0,172.21.15.255,4A:DD:00:FF:15:02,down,dhcp
     mv0,10.100.0.1,255.255.255.0,10.100.0.255,40:FD:00:00:01:0A,up,static
     lp0,172.22.0.12,255.255.255.0,172.22.0.255,4A:DD:00:FF:15:04,down,static
     lp1,172.22.1.12,255.255.255.0,172.22.1.255,4A:DD:00:FF:15:05,down,static
     dummy0,192.168.111.100,255.255.255.0,192.168.111.255,00:00:00:00:00:00,down,static

It get changes and for interfaces which have been commented.

I have tried to make any exception for it - but it doesn't work for one line:

    awk -F\, '{ if ($1 !~ /[#]|^$/interface_name ) {print $2,$3,$4,$5,$6,$7} }' interface_name=lv0 /etc/network/ifaces
    192.168.0.1 255.255.255.0 192.168.0.255 4A:DD:00:00:01:0A up static
    172.20.8.1 255.255.248.0 172.20.15.255 4A:DD:00:FF:15:01 up static
    172.21.8.1 255.255.248.0 172.21.15.255 4A:DD:00:FF:15:02 down static
    10.10.0.1 255.255.255.0 10.10.0.255 40:FD:00:00:01:0A down static
    172.22.0.1 255.255.255.0 172.22.0.255 4A:DD:00:FF:15:04 down static
    172.22.1.1 255.255.255.0 172.22.1.255 4A:DD:00:FF:15:05 down static
    192.168.111.111 255.255.255.0 192.168.111.255 00:00:00:00:00:00 down static

How I can do it for my case ?

Thank you in advance.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

You're using awk already so why add a shell loop and a sed command?

It LOOKS like all you're trying to do is replace the values in /etc/network/ifaces with the values from $SPATH/ifaces that have the same interface name. If so, the whole thing is just:

awk -F, 'NR==FNR{a[$1]=$0; next} {print ($1 in a ? a[$1] : $0}' $SPATH/ifaces /etc/network/ifaces > tmp && mv tmp /etc/network/ifaces

It looks like commented lines and blank lines won't be an issue because they'd only match between files when it doesn't matter (blank is blank and the first couple of lines in each file are identical, and there's no commented out "real" data lines in your second file) but if they do then just tweak it to exclude them when parsing the first file:

awk -F, 'NR==FNR{if (!/^(#|$)/) a[$1]=$0; next} {print ($1 in a ? a[$1] : $0}' $SPATH/ifaces /etc/network/ifaces > tmp && mv tmp /etc/network/ifaces
share|improve this answer

To match a pattern in awk based on a bash variable, you can do something like this:

awk -v interface_name=$inter '$0 ~ interface_name {print $0}' inputfile

This command passes bash variable $inter to awk variable interface_name (note the -v option), and then filters all lines containing the sting in the variable (with $0 ~ interface_name)

share|improve this answer
    
I have no problem with field separator. For my last expression I want to get only line, related with my variable $interface_name. In your command I got the same result, as in my case. ( –  Evgheni Antropov Feb 16 '13 at 9:56
    
real strange, but it doesn't work too. May be it related with my awk version, which is using from busybox. awk --version BusyBox v1.20.2 (2012-07-18 09:31:57 EEST) multi-call binary. –  Evgheni Antropov Feb 16 '13 at 10:02
    
options -v working well, also I have found here an alternative variant to use bash to awk without -v options. I have checked your expression on my normal system and it's doesn't work too ( –  Evgheni Antropov Feb 16 '13 at 10:08
    
may be I will try to explained. My last expression from the main post it's good for me, only with one exclusion: I want to get only one line , related with my variable interface_name, but with all regexp excluding, which I using there. –  Evgheni Antropov Feb 16 '13 at 10:11
    
let us continue this discussion in chat –  Evgheni Antropov Feb 16 '13 at 10:12
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Have do it in this way, but a lot of thanks for user user000001

    awk -F\, '{ if ($1 !~ /[#]|^$/interface_name  && $1 ~ interface_name) {print $2,$3,$4,$5,$6,$7} }' interface_name=lv0 /etc/network/ifaces
    172.20.8.1 255.255.248.0 172.20.15.255 4A:DD:00:FF:15:01 up static
share|improve this answer
    
THINK about the regexp you're writing as what you wrote is nonsense. # is not a regexp metacharacter so doesn't need to be inside [], ^$ represents a blank line so how can you have a blank line AND an interface name on the same line, and I don't know what the awk interpreter is making of $fld !~ /../var but I doubt if it's concatenating your variable with anything you'd want it to. It looks like all you really need is $1 == interface_name and it does NOT need to be inside an if statement - put it in the condition part of the awk body. –  Ed Morton Feb 16 '13 at 12:36
    
I added an answer that'll do your whole shell script in a brief awk command, that'd be your best starting point at least. –  Ed Morton Feb 16 '13 at 12:52

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