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I have a fixed-sized array where the size of the array is always in factor of 3.

my @array = ('foo', 'bar', 'qux', 'foo1', 'bar', 'qux2', 3, 4, 5);

How can I cluster the member of array such that we can get an array of array group by 3:

$VAR = [ ['foo','bar','qux'],
         ['foo1','bar','qux2'],
         [3, 4, 5] ];
share|improve this question
2  
Watch out, all the splice based options below are destructive to your array. You will need to work on a copy if you want to preserve your original array. –  daotoad Sep 29 '09 at 23:38
    
This is a very important note re: splice. Addedum: natatime is implemented using splice as well, so is subject to the above note. –  DVK Sep 30 '09 at 12:27

9 Answers 9

up vote 17 down vote accepted
my @VAR;
push @VAR, [ splice @array, 0, 3 ] while @array;

or you could use natatime from List::MoreUtils

use List::MoreUtils qw(natatime);

my @VAR;
{
  my $iter = natatime 3, @array;
  while( my @tmp = $iter->() ){
    push @VAR, \@tmp;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Brad - +1 for List::MoreUtils - it's a great gem all-around even outside of this answer. –  DVK Sep 30 '09 at 12:31
    
Also, please note that - at least as of 2/2009 - there was a memory leak in XS version of natatime (no leak in PP version). See perlmonks.org/?node_id=742364 –  DVK Sep 30 '09 at 12:41
    
In Perl 6 you could write it as @array.rotor(3,0) –  Brad Gilbert Apr 1 at 14:10

Another answer (a variation on Tore's, using splice but avoiding the while loop in favor of more Perl-y map)

my $result = [ map { [splice(@array, 0, 3)] } (1 .. (scalar(@array) + 2) % 3) ];
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2  
I wouldn't call it more Perl-y just because it uses map() - it's largely much more cluttered and harder to grok. The most "Perl-y" solution is natatime() because it's from CPAN. –  Chris Lutz Sep 30 '09 at 3:26
2  
Hmm... I can't say I greatly disagree with you re: possibly harder to grok. But having been a professional Perl developer for many years, I have encountered enough bad-to-horrible junk on CPAN that I don't necessarily consider "uses something from CPAN" to be a Good Householding Seal Of Approval of a perl solution. Mind you, List::MoreUtils, from my cursory examination today, appears to be a very neat and useful module, so it is definitely not included in the gripe above :) –  DVK Sep 30 '09 at 12:32
1  
@DVK - When I say "because it's from CPAN," I'm lovingly poking fun at the trends of my favorite language, not offering it as the be-all end-all of solutions. We really need to find a way to express sarcasm on the internets. –  Chris Lutz Sep 30 '09 at 17:50
1  
Sorry. After 2 sleepless nights, my sarcasm module is not loading. –  DVK Sep 30 '09 at 18:06

I really like List::MoreUtils and use it frequently. However, I have never liked the natatime function. It doesn't produce output that can be used with a for loop or map or grep.

I like to chain map/grep/apply operations in my code. Once you understand how these functions work, they can be very expressive and very powerful.

But it is easy to make a function to work like natatime that returns a list of array refs.

sub group_by ($@) {
    my $n     = shift;
    my @array = @_;

    croak "group_by count argument must be a non-zero positive integer"
        unless $n > 0 and int($n) == $n;

    my @groups;
    push @groups, [ splice @array, 0, $n ] while @array;

    return @groups;
}

Now you can do things like this:

my @grouped = map [ reverse @$_ ],
              group_by 3, @array;

** Update re Chris Lutz's suggestions **

Chris, I can see merit in your suggested addition of a code ref to the interface. That way a map-like behavior is built in.

# equivalent to my map/group_by above
group_by { [ reverse @_ ] } 3, @array;

This is nice and concise. But to keep the nice {} code ref semantics, we have put the count argument 3 in a hard to see spot.

I think I like things better as I wrote it originally.

A chained map isn't that much more verbose than what we get with the extended API. With the original approach a grep or other similar function can be used without having to reimplement it.

For example, if the code ref is added to the API, then you have to do:

my @result = group_by { $_[0] =~ /foo/ ? [@_] : () } 3, @array;

to get the equivalent of:

my @result = grep $_->[0] =~ /foo/,
             group_by 3, @array;

Since I suggested this for the sake of easy chaining, I like the original better.

Of course, it would be easy to allow either form:

sub _copy_to_ref { [ @_ ] }

sub group_by ($@) {
    my $code = \&_copy_to_ref;
    my $n = shift;

    if( reftype $n eq 'CODE' ) {
        $code = $n;
        $n = shift;
    }

    my @array = @_;

    croak "group_by count argument must be a non-zero positive integer"
        unless $n > 0 and int($n) == $n;

    my @groups;
    push @groups, $code->(splice @array, 0, $n) while @array;

    return @groups;
}

Now either form should work (untested). I'm not sure whether I like the original API, or this one with the built in map capabilities better.

Thoughts anyone?

** Updated again **

Chris is correct to point out that the optional code ref version would force users to do:

group_by sub { foo }, 3, @array;

Which is not so nice, and violates expectations. Since there is no way to have a flexible prototype (that I know of), that puts the kibosh on the extended API, and I'd stick with the original.

On a side note, I started with an anonymous sub in the alternate API, but I changed it to a named sub because I was subtly bothered by how the code looked. No real good reason, just an intuitive reaction. I don't know if it matters either way.

share|improve this answer
2  
Why not have group_by take a code reference as the first argument, so we can determine what to do with our group? Usage: group_by { [ @_ ] } 3, @array; –  Chris Lutz Sep 30 '09 at 3:43
    
Ideal syntax would be group_by 3 { [ @_ ] } @array; but of course we'd need to explicitly declare the anonymous sub for Perl not to whine. –  Chris Lutz Sep 30 '09 at 3:54
    
The only problem with the second version that uses an optional code reference is that the map { code } @list syntax only works if the subroutine is prototyped to have the first argument be a code reference. As written, you would need to explicitly specify that the code block was a sub (or declare the sub somewhere else and pass a reference to it). Also, I wouldn't have bothered writing a named subroutine for _copy_to_ref() and just said my $code = sub { [ @_ ] }; but that's just me. It might be more efficient to do it your way. –  Chris Lutz Sep 30 '09 at 17:39

Or this:

my $VAR;
while( my @list = splice( @array, 0, 3 ) ) {
    push @$VAR, \@list;
}
share|improve this answer

Try this:

$VAR = [map $_ % 3 == 0 ? ([ $array[$_], $array[$_ + 1], $array[$_ + 2] ]) 
                        : (),
            0..$#array];
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure whether +1 it for cuteness or -1 it for sheer hackiness :) Unvoted it stays. –  DVK Sep 29 '09 at 8:25
    
-1, because I would 100% make a mistake somewhere in there :) –  Karel Bílek Sep 30 '09 at 0:00
perl -e '
use List::NSect qw{spart};
use Data::Dumper qw{Dumper};
my @array = ("foo", "bar", "qux", "foo1", "bar", "qux2", 3, 4, 5);
my $var = spart(3, @array);
print Dumper $var;
'

$VAR1 = [
      [
        'foo',
        'bar',
        'qux'
      ],
      [
        'foo1',
        'bar',
        'qux2'
      ],
      [
        3,
        4,
        5
      ]
    ];
share|improve this answer

Another generic solution, non-destructive to the original array:

use Data::Dumper;

sub partition {
    my ($arr, $N) = @_; 

    my @res;
    my $i = 0;

    while ($i + $N-1 <= $#$arr) {
        push @res, [@$arr[$i .. $i+$N-1]];
        $i += $N; 
    }   

    if ($i <= $#$arr) {
        push @res, [@$arr[$i .. $#$arr]];
    }   
    return \@res;
}

print Dumper partition(
    ['foo', 'bar', 'qux', 'foo1', 'bar', 'qux2', 3, 4, 5], 
    3   
);

The output:

$VAR1 = [
          [
            'foo',
            'bar',
            'qux'
          ],
          [
            'foo1',
            'bar',
            'qux2'
          ],
          [
            3,
            4,
            5
          ]
        ];
share|improve this answer

As a learning experience I decided to do this in Perl6

The first, perhaps most simplest way I tried was to use map.

my @output := @array.map: -> $a, $b?, $c? { [ $a, $b // Nil, $c // Nil ] };
.say for @output;
foo bar qux
foo1 bar qux2
3 4 5

That didn't seem very scalable. What if I wanted to take the items from the list 10 at a time, that would get very annoying to write. ... Hmmm I did just mention "take" and there is a keyword named take lets try that in a subroutine to make it more generally useful.

sub at-a-time ( @array, $n = 1 ){
  my $pos = 0;
  # gather is used with take
  gather loop {
    my $next = ($pos + $n);

    # try to get just enough for this iteration
    my $gimme = @array.gimme($next);

    # stop the loop if there is no more elements left
    last unless $pos < $gimme;

    take item @array[ $pos ..^ $next ];
    $pos = $next;
  }
}

For kicks lets try it against an infinite list of the fibonacci sequence

my @fib = 1, 1, *+* ... *;
my @output := at-a-time( @fib, 3 );
.say for @output[^5]; # just print out the first 5
1 1 2
3 5 8
13 21 34
55 89 144
233 377 610

Notice that I used := instead of =, that is the binding operator (I could have also used ::= for readonly binding). It was necessary to prevent Perl6 from trying to find all of the elements of the list (may not be necessary when Perl 6 is finalized). Since it would have been trying to get all of the elements from an infinite list, it would have never stopped until the computer ran out of memory.

Which brings up another question, why didn't the sub blow-up when given an infinite list?
That is what gather is for, it effectively defines a lazy list by encompassing a looping construct which is called every time the list needs more items. take is used to put more items into the lazy list that gather creates.

item is used here to prevent flattening into the outer list, which may not be necessary when Perl 6 is finally out.


Wait a minute, I just remembered .rotor.

my @output := @fib.rotor(3);
@output[^5].map: *.say;
1 1 2
3 5 8
13 21 34
55 89 144
233 377 610

.rotor is actually far more powerful than I've demonstrated.

Currently (from the working branch in git) if you want it to return a partial match at the end you will need to add a :partial to the arguments of .rotor.

share|improve this answer

Below a more generic solution to the problem:

my @array = ('foo', 'bar', 1, 2);
my $n = 3;
my @VAR = map { [] } 1..$n;
my @idx = sort map { $_ % $n } 0..$#array;

for my $i ( 0..$#array ){
        push @VAR[ $idx[ $i ] ], @array[ $i ];
}

This also works when the number of items in the array is not a factor of 3. In the above example, the other solutions with e.g. splice would produce two arrays of length 2 and one of length 0.

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