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I have a single FileScanner Thread that adds new files in a list and multiple FileParser Threads that get new files and each parses its own files. for synchronization sake, I placed the addition to the list and reading from the list in synchronized resource block. the problem is that sometimes the FileScanner Thread seems to starve and doesn't enter the synchronized block waiting for other FileParser threads to release the resource (the list). my question is, if I set the maximum priority to my FileScanner and minimum one to other FileParser threads, would it resolve the problem? in other words, does thread priority has any impact in order for JVM to choose among threads to grant access to synchronized block? Thanks.

UPDATE:

private List<ScannerFile> scannedFiles = Collections.synchronizedList(new LinkedList<ScannerFile>()) ;

this is called in my FileScanner thread:

    synchronized(scannedFiles){
        for(ScannerFile f: newList)
            try{
                scannedFiles.add(f);
            }
            catch(ConcurrentModificationException e){
                logger.error(e);
            }
    }

And this is called in my FileParser threads:

synchronized(scannedFiles){
    try{
        for(ScannerFile f: scannedFiles){
            if(parserName.equals(f.getParserName()) && f.isNew() == true){
                listNewFiles.add(f);
            }           
        }
        return listNewFiles;
    }
    catch(ConcurrentModificationException e){
        logger.trace(e);
        return new ArrayList<ScannerFile>();
    }
}
share|improve this question
2  
Using a concurrent collection instead of a synchronized one would reduce contention. – assylias Feb 16 '13 at 11:07
    
I found the solution in tutorials.jenkov.com/java-concurrency/… – mostafa.S Feb 19 '13 at 10:43
    
Not sure what you found there. The guy seems to try to reimplement a lock, which already exists in the java.util.concurrent package. I don't see the point of doing that to be honest (unless you want to introduce subtle bugs). – assylias Feb 19 '13 at 10:57
    
@assylias dear do you mean there is a fair-lock in jdk? the guy just implemented a new one himself I suppose becuase there isn't any already. is it? – mostafa.S Feb 20 '13 at 9:21
    
Yes you've got 2 of them: ReentrantLock and ReentrantReadWriteLock. But the situations where you should use a fair lock are very rare, because the performance penalty is generally not worth it. As suggested in my first comment, use a concurrent collection instead of a synchronized one to improve performance without having to delve in complicated low level multi-threading stuff (read: bugs). – assylias Feb 20 '13 at 11:56

Thread priority is a hint or advice, that may or may not have an impact. Therefore it is dangerous to rely on priority settings for correctness of a concurrent program.

From "Java Concurrency In Practice" (Goetz et al):

Avoid the temptation to use thread priorities, since they can increase platform dependence and can cause liveness problems.[...]

If your program encounters deadlocks, there is a problem with the concurrency logic. Changing thread priorities would (in unlikely the best case) mask that problem or (in the likely case) introduce undetermined, hardware specific behavior.

The description of your problem, looks like a prime example for a ReadWriteLock. But without a concise example of your code, it is hard to give a sound advice.

share|improve this answer
    
@Pyanja I added some code snippet, hoping it will help. thanks – mostafa.S Feb 16 '13 at 11:16

Thread priority should not make or break synchronization. Sounds like a problem in your blocking collection, which you should not have to implement yourself anyway. Take a look at LinkendBlockingQueue and friends in java.util.concurrent.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your response, however it is not about making or breaking synchronization. when a thread is in a synchronized block, other threads will wait until the thread inside the block quits, they wait but they don't queue. I mean the next thread to enter is not chosen by a FIFO algorithm. I mean it's like random or something. I want to know if priority has any impact on the matter. – mostafa.S Feb 18 '13 at 13:54
1  
With Lock classes in the concurrent package, you have the option to make them fair for a small price in efficiency. You can not do this with synchronized blocks. Without fairness, the choice of next thread is made by the OS, where priorities influence, but determine scheduling. – Ralf H Feb 18 '13 at 14:01
    
Thanks @Ralf H, I will check concurrent package for fairness. – mostafa.S Feb 19 '13 at 10:30
1  
However @Ralf as you know in java case, it's not OS who chooses, it's JVM. – mostafa.S Feb 19 '13 at 10:40

There is a logic error. This should work (i did not have an IDE to reconfirm):

LinkedBlockingQueue<ScannerFile> newList = new LinkedBlockingQueue<>();
LinkedBlockingQueue<ScannerFile> scannedFiles = new LinkedBlockingQueue<>();
for(;;){

try{
ScannerFile f = newList.get();
scannedFiles.add(f);
}
catch(InterruptedException ex{
Thread.currentThread.interrupt();
//log
break;
}
}

ThreadParser will go like this:

for(;;){
try{
ScannedFile f= scannedFiles.get();
//other logic goes here
}catch(InterruptedException ex{
Thread.currentThread.interrupt();
//log
break;
}
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your verbose answer, however I think you misunderstood the problem. my program logic is fine and the whole program works fine 99% of the all times. just once in a week, the InputScanner Thread doesn't detect any file however other Threads are working at the moment. I know all this because I log every step taken. anyway my question is a general one, I just included the code for make it clear. – mostafa.S Feb 18 '13 at 13:48

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