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Can we say :

type
  TPerson = class
   private
     pName : string;
   public
     property Name : string read pName write pName;
end;

Is equal with :

 type
  TPerson = class
   private
     pName : string;
   public
     procedure SetName(val: string);
     function GetName:String;
end;

//{... implementing SetName And GetName...}

??

Please explain to me where we need to use "property" and where not. Tnx

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2  
In Delphi it's customary to use F as a prefix for (private) fields, i.e. FName. –  Uli Gerhardt Feb 16 '13 at 12:47
2  
Use whichever you prefer, whichever is more convenient. –  David Heffernan Feb 16 '13 at 12:58
1  
I would personally not use p for private fields because P is already widely used as a pointer type, such as PChar. F is the most predominantly used. –  Jerry Dodge Feb 17 '13 at 21:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

It's all about the design of the class. Technically, 'everything' you can do with properties, you can do without them, but the code will not be as elegant. Good design also makes the classes easier to use, and reduces the risk of making mistakes.

First, your comparing

TPerson = class
  private
    FName: string;
  public
    property Name: string read FName write FName;
  end;

to

TPerson = class
  private
    FName: string;
  public
    procedure SetName(const Name: string);
    function GetName: string;
  end;

isn't quite fair. Indeed, in the first case, you have no chance of doing something when the value is set (or read). So a more appropriate comparison would be to compare the latter code to

TPerson = class
  private
    FName: string;
    procedure SetName(const Name: string);
    function GetName: string;
  public
    property Name: string read GetName write SetName;
  end;

For instance, if you write a control, you often need to invalidate (basically, repaint) the control when you alter a property, say, the 'Sweater colour' of the TPerson. For instance,

TPerson = class
  private
    FSweaterColor: string;
    procedure SetSweaterColor(const Value: TColor);
  public
    property SweaterColor: TColor read FSweaterColor write SetSweaterColor;
  end;

  ...

  implementation

  procedure TPerson.SetSweaterColor(const Value: TColor);
  begin
    if FSweaterColor <> Value then
    begin
      FSweaterColor := Value;
      Invalidate; // causes a repaint of the control
    end;
  end;

Anyhow, what's the point of properties? Well, the point, basically, is to make a nice interface of the class: It should be easy to use for someone not interested in the details of its implementation. By using properties, you can achieve this goal. Indeed, to read the current colour of the sweater, you just read Anna.SweaterColor, and to set it, you just Anna.SweaterColor := clRed. You don't know if this simply sets a variable or causes a procedure to run, and you don't care. As far as you are concerned, a TPerson object simply has a readable and setable property called SweaterColor.

You can also create properties that are read-only (no write) or write-only (no read). But no matter how you implement the read and write (if at all) of a property, the property will look the same from the class user's point of view. He need not remember to use SetSweaterColor or GetSweaterColor (in fact, they are private and not accessible to him), but only the SweaterColor property.

This also hints at another benefit of using properties. Public and published properties are visible to the users of the class, while the private members are not (like the field FSweaterColor and the SetSweaterColor procedure). This is good. Because now you know that the only way for the class user to change the sweater colour of a person is to use the SweaterColor property, which guaranteed will repaint the control. If the FSweaterColor variable were public, the user of the class might set this and wonder, "why doesn't anything happen when I change the sweater color?" Of course, you don't need properties to get this benefit: a private FSweaterColor field and public GetSweaterColor and SetSweaterColor would do just as well, but then you'd need to write a GetSweaterColor function even though no processing is required to get the color. Also, the user of the class need to learn to use two identifiers instead of one.

More concretely, if you use the Delphi IDE to program, you will see that the published property (-y+ies) will show up in the Object Inspector, where you are allowed to read/change them (if applicable). How would that be possible if it weren't for properties?

All this being said, sometimes you don't use properties even though you could. For instance, if you have a read-only 'property', you might go for a single public GetSomething function instead of a read-only property. After all, that would save you some coding. Similarly, if you have a write-only property, you could go with a single public SetSomething procedure, which will also save you code. Finally, if you have a read/write property that requires no processing either way (neither to get nor to set), you could simply use a public variable!

So, after all, you need to decide on a good design of your class on a class-by-class basis. I guess the short version of my overly long answer is similar to David's comment:

Use whichever you prefer, whichever is more convenient.

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1  
This is too one-sided. There's really no big difference between Anna.SweaterColor := clRed and Anna.SetSweaterColor(clRed). It's just different syntax. If you are used to the latter then that reads just fine. No probs using that. The only significant differences are being able to return fields in property readers rather than having to write getter functions. And the need for properies for the OI. And I'm sure they were invented to serve OI. –  David Heffernan Feb 16 '13 at 13:19
1  
@David: I know. In fact, I've been thinking about it while dusting my apartment for the last 10 min. I'll add some more. –  Andreas Rejbrand Feb 16 '13 at 13:36
    
C++ programmers would say, why invent a language feature to do what we can already do just fine. I personally find properties readable but how much that is intrinsic, and how much is learnt behaviour? –  David Heffernan Feb 16 '13 at 13:41
    
+10 but I can only give +1 –  Jerry Dodge Feb 17 '13 at 21:45

Properties is a nice piece of syntactic sugar. They are equivalent to a pair of getEnabled and setEnabled Methods, but most programmers (and programming languages) prefer properties instead. For example there are less entries in the code-completion window.

Furthermore they separate "variable like" stuff (so the data, the object is supposed to work with) from the methods that work with the data.

Properties are not limited to components, they are very useful otherwise. You can define a public interface with a property and implement some validation logic afterwards. (Not possible with a public field) But you nee only two lines of code for a simple property, compared to 8 lines for the methods.

More important for the object inspector is the published keyword, only published properties are displayed in the OI.

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2  
Furthermore they separate "variable like" stuff (so the data, the object is supposed to work with) from the methods that work with the data. As do getter/setter methods. –  David Heffernan Feb 16 '13 at 13:26
    
But they are still methods. Have the method icon in the code completion. Can be used as callbacks functions. And they get clustered in code completion (being ordered alphabetically) and I cannot see whether it's readonly or read/write. –  DasKrümelmonster Feb 16 '13 at 14:22

No. These two codes are NOT equal.

We use property when we implement the TPerson class as a component, customizable in Delphi's Object Inspector. Take a look at the TButton class, for example. All the things you can alter in the Object Inspector (Caption, Width, Name, etc.) are marked in the source code with the property keyword.

If you create a class that will be used in your program but not as a component, you don't use the property keyword.

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5  
A property is an attribute of an object, where you can associate actions for reading and writing its data. There is no restriction for use in TComponents only. On the contrary, it's very useful for hiding implementation details of a class. –  LU RD Feb 16 '13 at 12:16
    
But what reason make us to don't use "property" in simple Classes (no component) ? Because it do what we need to do... –  Hamed Kamrava Feb 16 '13 at 12:25
    
@Hamed: It's about the design of the class. Technically, anything you can do with properties, you can do without them, but the code will be less elegant in many cases. –  Andreas Rejbrand Feb 16 '13 at 12:36
5  
Bogdan: Your last paragraph is simply wrong. True, the published properties show up in the Object Inspector, but that's just a bonus. After all, the Delphi programming language can be used in Notepad, and you'd still use properties. –  Andreas Rejbrand Feb 16 '13 at 12:40
2  
But I have to admit, that the Object Inspector 'bonus' is not only a bonus, as was my first guess, but maybe even a big motivation for introducing the property keyword. –  Andreas Rejbrand Feb 16 '13 at 15:09

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