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I'm wondering why I get an exception on the delete part in one case here, but not in the other.

No exception case

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class A
{
public:
    ~A() { cout << "A dtor" << endl; }
};

class B : public A
{
public:
    int x;
    ~B() { cout << "B dtor" << endl; }
};


A* f() { return new B; }

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    cout << sizeof(B) << " " << sizeof(A) << endl;
    A* bptr= f();
    delete bptr;
}

Herethe output is 4 1 .. A dtor, since A has 1 byte for identity and B has 4 because of int x.

Exception case

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class A
{
public:
    ~A() { cout << "A dtor" << endl; }
};

class B : public A
{
public:
    virtual ~B() { cout << "B dtor" << endl; }
};


A* f() { return new B; }

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    cout << sizeof(B) << " " << sizeof(A) << endl;
    A* bptr= f();
    delete bptr;
}

Here the output is 4 1 .. A dtor, since A has 1 byte for identity and B has 4 because of the vptr that's needed for its virtual destructor. But then a debug assertion fails inside the delete call (_BLOCK_TYPE_IS_VALID).

Environment

I'm running Windows 7 with Visual Studio 2010 SP1Rel.

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2  
Have you tried making the dtor of A virtual? This is required since you are calling delete on an A*. –  Daniel Frey Feb 16 '13 at 12:41
1  
LWS runs the second code w/o exceptions, even it's not correct code, because A's d-tor should be virtual –  borisbn Feb 16 '13 at 12:50
    
Try printing the original B pointer and the A pointer and see if they are different. I suspect that they will be different with VC++. They are the same with g++, and there is no exception with g++. –  Vaughn Cato Feb 16 '13 at 15:27
    
@VaughnCato They will be the same because it's a basic language guarantee. –  Yam Marcovic Feb 16 '13 at 16:04
    
@borisbn In VC++, it only asserts in debug mode, not in release. g++ does not use any debug-specific libraries by default, like VC++ does (in debug mode). Question is what would valgrind have to say about it. –  Yam Marcovic Feb 16 '13 at 16:06
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As others have pointed out, you are deleting an object whose static type is different from its dynamic type, and since the static type doesn't have a virtual destructor, you get undefined behavior. This includes the behavior of sometimes working and sometimes not working as you are seeing. However, I think you are interested in a little deeper understanding of what is happening with your particular compiler.

Class A has no members at all, so its data layout ends up looking like this:

struct A {
};

Since class B derives from class A, class A becomes embedded within B. When class B has no virtual functions, the layout ends up looking like this:

struct B {
  A __a_part;
  int x;
};

The compiler can convert a B* to an A* by just taking the address of __a_part, as if the compiler had a function like this:

A* convertToAPointer(B* bp) { return &bp->__a_part; }

Since __a_part is the first member of B, the B* and the A* point to the same address.

Code like this:

A* bptr = new B;
delete bptr;

Is effectively doing something like this:

// Allocate a new B
void* vp1 = allocateMemory(sizeof(B));
B* bp = static_cast<B*>(vp1);
bp->B(); // assume for a second that this was a legal way to construct

// Convert the B* to an A*
A* bptr = &bp->__a_part;

// Deallocate the A*
void* vp2 = ap;
deallocateMemory(vp2);

In this case, vp2 and vp1 are the same. The system is allocating and deallocating the same memory address, so the program runs without an error.

When class B has a virtual member function (the destructor in this case). The compiler adds a virtual table pointer, so class B ends up looking like this:

struct B {
  B_vtable* __vptr;
  A __a_part;
};

The issue here is that __a_part is no longer the first member, and the convertToAPointer operation will now change the address of the pointer, so vp2 and vp1 no longer point to the same address. Since a different memory location is being deallocated than the one that was allocated, you get the error.

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Just what I was looking for. Thanks! –  Yam Marcovic Feb 17 '13 at 16:54
    
Reviewing this, my error was indeed the assumption that the cast was a reinterpret_cast, when in actuality it was a static_cast. –  Yam Marcovic Dec 19 '13 at 19:15
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See this post

A quick summary:

  • You are telling the machine to delete an instance of A
  • As this is a class which we call through pointer/reference maybe we should use a virtual table (VT)?
  • There is no virtual members in A thus no VT is used
  • We call the standard destructor of A…
  • Bang! We are trying to delete class A but it happens that the pointer has lead us to object of B which contains VT which A didn't know of. sizeof(A) is 1 (as AFAIK it’s not legal to have size equal 0) and sizeof(B) is 4 (due to presence of VT). We wish to delete 1 byte, but there is a block of 4 bytes. Due to DEBUG heap monitoring, the error was caught.

The solution of course is to declare the base class's (A's) dtor as virtual so B's dtor will always be called.

EDIT: For the first case, here's what the standard has to say:

§5.3 In the first alternative (delete object), if the static type of the object to be deleted is different from its dynamic type, the static type shall be a base class of the dynamic type of the object to be deleted and the static type shall have a virtual destructor or the behavior is undefined. In the second alternative (delete array) if the dynamic type of the object to be deleted differs from its static type, the behavior is undefined.

So both cases lead us to the realm of undefined behavior which of course differs from one implementation to the other. But it stands to reason that for most implementations the first case is easier to handle or at least easier to contemplate than the second which is just an esoteric anti-pattern.

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I don't see how this explains the part where B contains an int, and is still 4 bytes, but no assertion fails. –  Yam Marcovic Feb 16 '13 at 14:37
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