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Recently i was asked a question in an interview which i couldn't do. Anyone got a solution for this?

Grab all connected IP´s on the Linux machine
check every connected IP if TCP port 1706 is open

if its open > execute command.  CURL ‘http:// some address ’ 
Else do nothing.
program will check this every 60 minits



Plattform Linux Ubuntu Server 12. X64 / x32

WAP in C++

Thanks!!

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closed as not a real question by Lightness Races in Orbit, Mat, Frank Shearar, Dukeling, SztupY Feb 16 '13 at 17:29

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
surely you can do some parts of it. what's your question? –  Karoly Horvath Feb 16 '13 at 13:21
    
ques is that what i mentioned above –  user1845209 Feb 16 '13 at 13:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Make a bash script.

LOGIC:

Use netstat -natp (filter it through awk/sed to get the ports, then grep it) Then use a simple test to see if the result was empty. Run curl if it was.

Put this in a cron job. Simple stuff, really.

EDIT:

netstat is a utility which will show you all of the connections on your computer. netstat -natp shows a list of the programs which have tcp sockets on your computer.

sed and awk are used for text formatting. You can use them to list a specific column.

grep searches input to find a specified string.

bash allows for basic logic, and can be used to see if a string is empty.

cron is a linux process which schedules commands to be run at certain times.

EDIT #2:

You COULD poll /proc/net/tcp, but since netstat does that and formats it nicely, why bother?

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sorry..i didnt understand. Can you pls elaborate? –  user1845209 Feb 16 '13 at 13:27
    
there, updated it to explain more thoroughly. –  cyphar Feb 16 '13 at 13:34
    
thanks for that..:) –  user1845209 Feb 16 '13 at 13:36
    
Yes i thought about Olaf Dietsche's answer for a moment but then realised that your's is more effective for me –  user1845209 Feb 16 '13 at 13:41

In Linux, you look for files in /proc/net and parse that.

For example, TCP connections are listed in /proc/net/tcp

head /proc/net/tcp

will show something like this

  sl  local_address rem_address   st tx_queue rx_queue tr tm->when retrnsmt   uid  timeout inode                                                     
   0: 00000000:0007 00000000:0000 0A 00000000:00000000 00:00000000 00000000     0        0 38148735 1 0000000000000000 100 0 0 10 -1                 
   1: 00000000:1F48 00000000:0000 0A 00000000:00000000 00:00000000 00000000   116        0 38923158 1 0000000000000000 100 0 0 10 -1                 
   2: 00000000:0CEA 00000000:0000 0A 00000000:00000000 00:00000000 00000000   120        0 12364094 1 0000000000000000 100 0 0 10 -1                 
   3: 0100007F:13AD 00000000:0000 0A 00000000:00000000 00:00000000 00000000  1000        0 26454267 1 0000000000000000 100 0 0 10 -1                 
   4: 0100007F:008F 00000000:0000 0A 00000000:00000000 00:00000000 00000000     0        0 5570 1 0000000000000000 100 0 0 10 -1                     
   5: 00000000:0050 00000000:0000 0A 00000000:00000000 00:00000000 00000000     0        0 27328173 1 0000000000000000 100 0 0 10 -1                 
   6: 0100007F:1913 00000000:0000 0A 00000000:00000000 00:00000000 00000000   116        0 38923868 1 0000000000000000 100 0 0 10 -1                 
   7: 00000000:0016 00000000:0000 0A 00000000:00000000 00:00000000 00000000     0        0 18983193 1 0000000000000000 100 0 0 10 -1                 
   8: 0100007F:0277 00000000:0000 0A 00000000:00000000 00:00000000 00000000     0        0 38681424 1 0000000000000000 100 0 0 10 -1                 

You can then split the lines, look for the open connections and act accordingly. Look at thesource of netstat for more.

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