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I hava a time string,the format is HHMM, I need to get the decimal of it, how can I do ?

e.g.

'1221'=1221

'0101'=101

'0011'=11

'0001'=1

If the string begins with "0x", the radix is 16 (hexadecimal)

If the string begins with "0", the radix is 8 (octal).

But I want to treat it as decimal no matter whether started with 0 or 00 or 000.


additional:

thanks all.

I had know what you said, what make I confused as following :

var temp1=0300; var temp2='0300';

parseInt(temp1,10)=192; parseInt(temp1,10)=300;

so I I doubt parseInt() and have this question .

share|improve this question
    
Ahh. I think I understand. "temp1" is a number declared as base8. parseInt does nothing to it because it's a number. 0300==192. However, temp2 is a string and the leading 0 is ignored because you've forced it to parse as base10. –  Glenn Sep 29 '09 at 8:02
    
Your question no longer makes sense. Please update it--as it is now; it's no use to anyone. –  roosteronacid Sep 29 '09 at 8:14

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Use parseInt() and specify the radix yourself.

parseInt("10")     // 10
parseInt("10", 10) // 10
parseInt("010")    //  8
parseInt("10", 8)  //  8
parseInt("0x10")   // 16
parseInt("10", 16) // 16

Note: You should always supply the optional radix parameter, since parseInt will try to figure it out by itself, if it's not provided. This can lead to some very weird behavior.


Update:

This is a bit of a hack. But try using a String object:

var s = "0300";

parseInt(s, 10); // 300

The down-side of this hack is that you need to specify a string-variable. None of the following examples will work:

parseInt(0300 + "", 10);              // 192    
parseInt(0300.toString(), 10);        // 192    
parseInt(Number(0300).toString(), 10) // 192
share|improve this answer
    
I would rather say: You need to specify the radix. –  Gumbo Sep 29 '09 at 7:43
    
@Gumbo - except of course that isn't true ;P You should specify the radix. –  annakata Sep 29 '09 at 7:55
    
@Gumbo & annakata: You are right. If you do not parse in the radix the function tries to figure it out by itself. Which can cause some very weird behaviour. –  roosteronacid Sep 29 '09 at 8:21

You can supply the radix parameter to parseInt():

var x = '0123';
x = parseInt(x, 10); // x == 123
share|improve this answer
    
In this case need to be careful with radix parameter, it's results may be unexpected: parseInt('0x300', 16); => 768 parseInt('0x300', 8); => 0 –  Anatoliy Sep 29 '09 at 8:18

If you want to keep it as a string, you can use regex:

num = num.replace(/^0*/, "");

If you want to turn it unto a number roosteronacid has the right code.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks. I had know what you said, what make I confused as following : var temp1=0300; var temp2='0300'; parseInt(temp1,10)=192; parseInt(temp1,10)=300; so I I doubt parseInt() and have this question . –  Cong De Peng Sep 29 '09 at 7:54
Number("0300") = Number(0300) = 300
share|improve this answer
    
Number(0300) = 192 –  Anax Sep 29 '09 at 8:15

Solution here:

function parse_int(num) {
    var radix = 10;
    if (num.charAt(0) === '0') {
        switch (num.charAt(1)) {
        case 'x':
            radix = 16;
            break;
        case '0':
            radix = 10;
            break;
        default:
            radix = 8;
            break;
    }
    return parseInt(num, radix);
}
var num8 = '0300';
var num16 = '0x300';
var num10 = '300';
parse_int(num8);  // 192
parse_int(num16); // 768
parse_int(num10); // 300
share|improve this answer
    
This won't work with 0030. –  Anax Sep 29 '09 at 8:28
    
Ops. This is fixed now. –  Anatoliy Sep 29 '09 at 8:53

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