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I am using SOAP with wsdl2objc generated code. I have multiple view controllers who need to share the data provided by the web service. I would like to have a data model part, but I am having a hard time seeing how to handle this. Naturally the calls should be asynch. My question is, what might be the best practise? Who should be responsible for fetching data? Who should store the data? How to handle concurrency? Any thoughts would be appreciated!

UPDATE: I was considering using CoreData, but was not sure if what the benefits were when the data is frequently updated. My biggest problem is how to handle the scenario where a view controller requests data from the model, but no data is available. That means performing a slow web service call and somehow informing the view controller when the data is in. Is notification centre the way to go here? how would the flow be? should the view controllers constantly be listening for update notifications? My thoughts are, that a view controller registers as an observer, populates the view with data from the model (regardless of empty data), and automatically updates on received notifications, i.e. fetches the data from the model which now has the "newest" data available. That leave all network call out of the view controllers, allows the view controllers to access shared data. Thoughts?

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2 Answers 2

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In your updated question, yes, I think notification center is the perfect way for a background network task to update your view controllers when new data is available.

You ask:

should the view controllers constantly be listening for update notifications?

Sort of. The term "constantly listening" might imply that it's constantly checking for updates. Clearly, it's not really doing that (or, more importantly, you don't want it to do that). Rather, it merely registers itself as an observer for that notification (and make sure when a view is dismissed, that it unregisters itself, too). That way, it will be notified of any of your custom notifications, but it's not wasting a lot of CPU cycles "constantly listening".

You then follow-up and ask:

My thoughts are, that a view controller registers as an observer, populates the view with data from the model (regardless of empty data), and automatically updates on received notifications, i.e. fetches the data from the model which now has the "newest" data available. That leave all network call out of the view controllers, allows the view controllers to access shared data. Thoughts?

Basically, yes, that sounds good. My only slight refinement to this would be that I would pre-populate the app database with data current as of the time that publish the app to the store. That way, the user has something to look at while the app is retrieving the latest data. Perhaps that's not valid in your scenario, but often it's better to show the user something (even if a little out of date), rather than nothing, while the app retrieves the latest and greatest.

Finally (and you probably are already contemplating this), I'd make sure you present the user some visual indication that data is being downloaded in the background. Perhaps a well-placed UIActivityIndicatorView (i.e. a spinner) or UIProgressView. Perhaps update the text of the UIRefreshControl to say that a download is in progress if you're dealing with tableviews. Perhaps also update the network activity indicator in the status bar, too.


I'm sure everyone has their own approaches to this, but here are some observations about what I did in an app that data retrieval process was complicated, happens entirely asynchronously, and the app can proceed as normal while the downloading/processing is in progress:

  1. In addition to the standard model, view, and view controller classes, I had a separate "xml controller" which did the downloading and parsing of the results. I had it kick off the download asynchronously.

  2. To facilitate the communication between the xml controller and the view controllers, I used notifications. That way the xml controller would post notifications regarding the starting and completing particular phases of the download/parse process. The view controllers could optionally present a spinner at the start if they're not reliable during the update process, and/or just refresh themselves accordingly up completion of the particular download/parse phase. Some care must be taken to really identify all of the application-layer concurrency issues. At every step you have to handle logical scenarios of "what if the model data for this changed in the background queue".

    Bottom line, when doing asynchronous updates, defensive programming is the rule of the day. You simply can never make assumptions that just because you recently retrieved something that it's valid even moments later. Many of the assumptions we blithely make in our code no longer hold. I'd also be more wary about any operations based upon some index (e.g. the "5th item") and definitely lean towards key-based operations (e.g. the "item with unique identifier of 4027").

  3. In terms of the database-layer concurrency issues, it depends a little upon the nature of your persistent storage. If you're using Core Data, check out WWDC 2012 - 214 Best Practices with Core Data which discusses concurrency. Or see Concurrency with Core Data in the Core Data Programming Guide. If using SQLite, one easy solution is to have a dedicated serial queue for database operations, such as FMDB's FMDatabaseQueue. By the way, if you use this latter approach, you will want to make sure you break down your database interaction into the smallest possible operations to avoid tying up the database.

  4. If you want to keep the user informed of the progress of the asynchronous download/update process, you might want to think about your framework for that. Some apps do something as simple as the network activity indicator in the status bar. Others update some status message in some communal navigation bar. I've also use a custom container for my notifications so that I didn't have to add "show the user status updates" in every view controller. A bunch of approaches here, but you should probably avoid solutions that entail your inclusion of status update code in each of your view controllers (other than, obviously, if the view controller is dependent upon the current item being modified by the background queue, in which case it's not a status update issue, but an application flow issue).

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Thank you for your comprehensive comments, much appreciated. I have some follow-up questions, see revised question –  SkeetSkeet Feb 20 '13 at 13:30
    
@SkeetSkeet I agree with many of your observations in your revised question. But I've updated my answer accordingly. –  Rob Feb 20 '13 at 14:01
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Thanks a lots for taking the time to provide a very helpful answer and pointing me in the right direction! UIRefreshControl will be implemented as soon as the public is ready for iOS 6 :) –  SkeetSkeet Feb 21 '13 at 16:50

Consuming SOAP directly from a iOS Applications is not very optimal because of the SOAP envelope overhead. I would suggest to use REST XML/JSON services instead.

If you do not have JSON/XML services, you can use a back end mobile platform to handle the complex SOAP protocol on the back end and let you consume lightweight, easy to handle REST/JSON on the front side.

Some "Open Source Mobile Application Development platform for Enterprise" Do offer these type of services.

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I am aware of this issue, but I am bound to the SOAP web service for now. However, for the low amount of data, performance is not a big issue. –  SkeetSkeet Feb 20 '13 at 13:31

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