Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm developing Desktop-Software with different OO-based languages. I haven't got in touch with web development since recently. I just started playing around with jQuery and jQuery Mobile to build simple web applications.

I noticed that my projects usually end up with a HTML-file as a base and a *.js file which contains the methods, eventhandlers etc. This somewhat feels like programming spaghetti code and I can't think of how this could work with more complex projects. (Reusability, Performance, ...)

Usual jQuery-Tutorials are just showing trivial examples which work well with the "all methods into a single script-file"-approach. I also read somewhere, that it is better to provide just a big file because it is faster to load just one file instead of a lot small files.

Can someone tell me how bigger jQuery-projects are structured and what the reasons for that are?

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by Rory McCrossan, Juhana, charlietfl, Alexander, abatishchev Feb 17 '13 at 9:23

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Actually, many large projects consist of multiple source files that are minified and concatenated into one file for distribution. –  Juhana Feb 16 '13 at 14:59
    
I think this is a perfectly valid question and it doesn't deserve the downvotes. What it deserves is a better title through. –  rcdmk Feb 16 '13 at 15:20
    
@rcdmk: Thanks for your contribution. It often is hard to find the right words for the question-title. I often notice how the title would fit better AFTER the question has been answered (and by that my thoughts on the problem have gone through some iterations) –  MOnsDaR Feb 16 '13 at 15:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I'll try to break up your question into smaller parts:

"I noticed that my projects usually end up with a HTML-file as a base and a *.js file which contains the methods, eventhandlers etc. This somewhat feels like programming spaghetti code and I can't think of how this could work with more complex projects."

Sounds like your OO background has you spoiled. Javascript won't force you to use it's prototypal inheritance, and neither will jQuery. Nevertheless, it is there. Douglas Crockford wrote a piece about moving from a classical OO-centric inheritance to the prototypal equivalent: Prototypal Inheritance in Javascript

"Usual jQuery-Tutorials are just showing trivial examples which work well with the "all methods into a single script-file"-approach."

Yes, putting all your code in one file will work fine for a small website or web-app, but it doesn't scale.

However this is no difference from putting all your C method declarations in one header and all the code in one source file. My point being that you don't have too.

I'd recommend you look at a script loader like RequireJS as a solution to this problem. In worst case there's still nothing wrong with putting your script tags inline in your HTML code but this also doesn't scale well.

"I also read somewhere, that it is better to provide just a big file because it is faster to load just one file instead of a lot small files."

Well ... yes, but this is negligible in most cases. Even if you do see a drop in performance, why treat your development code as your production? Use a compression tool such as YUI Compressor to compress and merge your JavaScript. Smaller load times without the pollution.

Final piece of advice: jQuery is not going to help you solve your JavaScript architecture problems any more than a dictionary will help you structure a sentence. (In other words, don't rely on jQuery examples to teach you good JavaScript practices).

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 For "don't rely on jQuery examples to teach you good JavaScript practices" –  rcdmk Feb 16 '13 at 15:24
    
This clearifies a lot. Thanks for the links, I'm currently reading –  MOnsDaR Feb 16 '13 at 16:01

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.