Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have this piece of code that I'm trying to get my head around, I don't even know if its syntactically correct (part of the exercise I guess!)

%{$records}

What do the curly brackets signify? I've seen the same case but with a @ operator used instead of the $ if that makes a difference.

Thanks guys!

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

The “Using References” section of the perlref documentation explains.

2. Anywhere you’d put an identifier (or chain of identifiers) as part of a variable or subroutine name, you can replace the identifier with a BLOCK returning a reference of the correct type. In other words, the previous examples could be written like this:

   $bar = ${$scalarref};
   push(@{$arrayref}, $filename);
   ${$arrayref}[0] = "January";
   ${$hashref}{"KEY"} = "VALUE";
   &{$coderef}(1,2,3);
   $globref->print("output\n"); # iff IO::Handle is loaded

In your case, $records must be a reference to a hash (because of the outermost %), {$records} is a block that returns the reference, and %{$records} gives the original hash.

The curly braces surround a bona fide block. In fact, you could replace the code above with

%{ if ($records) { $records } else { $default_records } }

But even the shorter version from your question could be simplified, as pointed out earlier in the documentation.

1. Anywhere you’d put an identifier (or chain of identifiers) as part of a variable or subroutine name, you can replace the identifier with a simple scalar variable containing a reference of the correct type:

   $bar = $$scalarref;
   push(@$arrayref, $filename);
   $$arrayref[0] = "January";
   $$hashref{"KEY"} = "VALUE";
   &$coderef(1,2,3);
   print $globref "output\n";

Because $records is a simple scalar, %$records is the underlying hash.

If instead $records were a reference to an array, the syntax for dereferencing it would be @$records or @{$records}.

share|improve this answer

In common with many Unix shells, Perl allows the use of braces to delimit variable identifiers, so my ${scalar} is the same as my $scalar. This is useful, for example, when interepolating the value of a variable into a string, when "$scalartext" will look for a variable with the identifier scalartext, when what is intended is $scalar.'text'. Instead of this you can write "${scalar}text" to get the correct result.

Perl will accept either a bare variable identifier or an expression returning a reference to a variable within the braces, so %{$hashref} is the same as %$hashref. Note that a string is unacceptable as it is treated as a symbolic reference which is an error under strict 'refs', so ${'scalar'} is wrong here.

In your case, %{$records} is identical to %$records, and some prefer it because it makes the dereferencing clear. It represents the hash to which hash reference $records refers.

share|improve this answer
2  
It happens to be true that it works as a delimiter. That's an intentional but accidental property. The fundamental property is that the braces establish a BLOCK. It is convenient, and part of the design, that the BLOCK's value can then be used by the surrounding expression without ambiguity about where the BLOCK begins or ends. –  darch Feb 16 '13 at 21:49

It is how you dereference a reference.

See perldoc perlref.

As usual the % or @ states what sort of data you want ("A hash" or "An array").

This is followed by a block {} which returns a reference to the appropriate data type.

So: %{$records} takes a scalar ($records) containing a reference to a hash, and gives you back a hash.

share|improve this answer
    
It is simply a delimiter for the hash identifier, and is nothing to do with dereferencing. It is also not a block. –  Borodin Feb 16 '13 at 15:34
4  
@Borodin — From the linked documentation: Anywhere you'd put an identifier (or chain of identifiers) as part of a variable or subroutine name, you can replace the identifier with a BLOCK returning a reference of the correct type –  Quentin Feb 16 '13 at 15:35
    
It is a very odd sort of block, as ${varname} is fine, but my $x = {varname} is not. It is more like my $x = do { no strict 'subs'; no warnings 'reserved'; varname }; –  Borodin Feb 16 '13 at 15:49
1  
@Borodin Apples and oranges. Dereferencing uses bona fide blocks. The braces in the example above are from a syntactic alternative. From perldata: “As in some shells, you can enclose the variable name in braces to disambiguate it from following alphanumerics (and underscores). You must also do this when interpolating a variable into a string to separate the variable name from a following double-colon or an apostrophe, since these would be otherwise treated as package separators” –  Greg Bacon Feb 16 '13 at 17:12
2  
@Borodin: not a block? think at this use strict; sub foo { \@{shift()} }; print "an year has @{ my $v = sqrt(144); foo([$v])} months"; –  ArtM Feb 16 '13 at 22:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.