Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was experimenting with std::async and ended up with a code that looks like that :

class obj {
public:
    int val;

    obj(int a) : val(a) {
        cout << "new obj" << endl;
    }
    ~obj() {
        cout << "delete obj" << endl;
    }
};


void foo(obj a) {

    this_thread::sleep_for(chrono::milliseconds(500));
    cout << a.val << endl;
}

int main(int argc, int **args) {

    obj a(5);
    auto future = async(foo, a);
    future.wait();

    return 0;
}

and the result is :

new obj
delete obj
delete obj
delete obj
5
delete obj
delete obj
delete obj

I then tried to change void foo(obj a) by void foo(obj &a) :

new obj
delete obj
delete obj
delete obj
5
delete obj
delete obj

Why would 5 copies of my object be made for this simple code? I have to admit, I'm really confused. Would someone care to explain this?

Edit

I'm using VS2012

share|improve this question
1  
Try to make a copy or move constructor in the obj class. –  Joachim Pileborg Feb 16 '13 at 15:58
    
While he is seeing the effects of the copy constructor, it still would be interesting to know why there are 5 additional copies. My simple mind following the code can see three (maybe 4) obvious ones, but at least two are not immediately obvious. –  Chad Feb 16 '13 at 16:04
1  
Using const obj& as foo's argument on GCC 4.7, I get 3 "delete obj", which means 2 copies are being made. –  mfontanini Feb 16 '13 at 16:23
    
@JoachimPileborg the copy constructor is called as many time as there is deletes. But i'm more interested to know why the copy constructor is called that many times, and maybe how to prevent this (it would be quite a waste if it was a bigger object) –  user1278743 Feb 16 '13 at 16:26
    
Are you compiling using optimizations enabled? –  mfontanini Feb 16 '13 at 16:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In your case, obj is being copied:

  1. Twice by the call to std::async.
  2. Twice by async's internal call to std::bind.
  3. Once by the call to void foo(obj a) since it takes a by value.

Believe it or not, the number of copies has actually been reduced since VC10.

It is not at all uncommon to see a library (be it the standard library or another one) trigger a few more copies than you would expect on your types. And usually, there is not too much you can do about it in.

There are 2 things that people commonly do to prevent copies:

  1. Take obj by reference (or in your case, const ref since foo does not modify obj). This will require using std::ref with async.
  2. Define a move constructor for obj. This won't prevent temporaries from being constructed and destroyed, but it will give you a chance to optimize the process a bit.

Note that in your bare example of an object that holds onto only one int, it might actually be faster to copy rather than move or pass by reference.


Example for passing obj by reference into async:

void foo(const obj& a) {
    this_thread::sleep_for(chrono::milliseconds(500));
    cout << a.val << endl;
}

int main(int argc, int **args) {
    obj a(5);
    auto future = async(foo, std::cref(a));
    future.wait();

    return 0;
}

Example for defining a move constructor:

class obj
{
public:
    /* ... */

    obj(obj&& a) : val(move(a.val)) {
        // It is good practice to 0 out the moved object to catch use-after-move bugs sooner.
        a.val = 0;
    }

    /* ... */
};
share|improve this answer
    
as described here stackoverflow.com/a/15040860/893819 I think declairing a move constructor can actually stop temporaries from being created. –  PorkyBrain Feb 23 '13 at 13:25
    
@PorkyBrain, that's not what the answer says. The compiler is allowed to elide copies too, it's not controlled by the presence of a move cosntructor –  Jonathan Wakely Feb 23 '13 at 14:03

a is being copied during the bind phase. To avoid multiple copies of a, use move constructor semantics:

Add a move ctor to obj:

class obj {
public:
    ...
    obj(obj&& other) {
        cout << "move obj" << endl;
        val = std::move(other.val);
    }
};

In main:

    obj a(5);
    auto future = async(foo, std::move(a));
    ...

This way, 5 instances of obj will still be created, but since async supports movable objects, the same copy will be moved from instance to instance (for heavy objects this will be significant over copying the object around). So now the output should be:

new obj
move obj
move obj
move obj
move obj
delete obj
delete obj
delete obj
5
delete obj
delete obj
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.