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I have a div with class 'bannergroup' that contains multiple divs 'banneritem'. I want these items to rotate (fade in then fade out) in place of each other.

I can have several divs with the class bannergroup and each one should rotate separately.

Here is the HTML:

<div class="bannergroup">
  <div class="banneritem">Only visible one at a time</div>
  <div class="banneritem">Only visible one at a time</div>
  <div class="banneritem">Only visible one at a time</div>
  <div class="banneritem">Only visible one at a time</div>
</div>

<div class="bannergroup">
  <div class="banneritem">Only visible one at a time</div>
  <div class="banneritem">Only visible one at a time</div>
  <div class="banneritem">Only visible one at a time</div>
  <div class="banneritem">Only visible one at a time</div>
</div>

My Jquery looks like:

$('.banneritem').css('display', 'none');
$('.bannergroup').children('.banneritem').each(function( i ) {
  $(this).fadeIn().delay(4000).fadeOut();               
});

The problem: the each statement continues to run before the previous div completes. I want it to wait until the previous child is gone. Also, I need this to continuously run. After a single time it stops. I can put this into a function, but I am not sure how to know to call it again.

EDIT: There are not always 4 child items. Also one group may have a different number of children than the others, but they should both rotate in-sync. It is ok if one completes before the other and then just restarts itself.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I have answered this question multiple times before. This time I will try wrapping it in a jQuery plugin. The .rotate() function will apply the effect you want to the children of the matched elements, a fade in/out effect per children in a continuous animation.

$.fn.rotate = function(){
  return this.each(function() {

    /* Cache element's children */
    var $children = $(this).children();

    /* Current element to display */
    var position = -1;

    /* IIFE */
    !function loop() {

        /* Get next element's position.
         * Restarting from first children after the last one.
         */
        position = (position + 1) % $children.length;

        /* Fade element */
        $children.eq(position).fadeIn(1000).delay(1000).fadeOut(1000, loop);
    }();
  });
};

Usage:

$(function(){
  $(".banneritem").hide();
  $(".bannergroup").rotate();
});  

See it here.

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Awesome- worked perfectly! Sorry I could not find your previous answers. Thank You! –  jpsnow72 Feb 16 '13 at 16:36
    
@jpsnow72, no problem –  Alexander Feb 16 '13 at 16:45
    
@Alexander I looked at further examples of your code as it peaked my interest in it being clever so I could glean some good bits. I do have one question though, you are declaring an anonymous function, then a named function with recursion within. Would it not be more efficient (but not terse) to name the recursive function outside the .each ? –  Jason Sebring Feb 16 '13 at 17:45
    
You need a higher scope for the position variable. You will still need two functions I believe, and moving the named function out of the .each() will increase the complexity for those variables –  Alexander Feb 16 '13 at 17:50
    
ok a fair trade off –  Jason Sebring Feb 16 '13 at 18:01
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jsFiddle example

$('div.bannergroup').each(function () {
    $('div.banneritem', this).not(':first').hide();
    var thisDiv = this;
    setInterval(function () {
        var idx = $('div.banneritem', thisDiv).index($('div.banneritem', thisDiv).filter(':visible'));
        $('div.banneritem:eq(' + idx + ')', thisDiv).fadeOut(function () {
            idx++;
            if (idx == ($('div.banneritem', thisDiv).length)) idx = 0;
            $('div.banneritem', thisDiv).eq(idx).fadeIn();
        });
    }, 2000);
});
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I can see that it works. You may want to correct the wrong markup that you used to test it though :) –  Alexander Feb 16 '13 at 17:57
    
@j08691 Is it possible to change the the current one by clicking one a link? E.g. I have a navigation in which I want to have 4 buttons. These four buttons display my 4 banneritems. I click on Button 1 and it shows banneritem 1. Click on Button2 and it shows banneritem 2. After that it continues with the right, following banneritem. –  ShawnWhite Oct 29 '13 at 14:13
    
@ShawnWhite - Sorry but I don't understand what you're asking. Can you create a new question with an example? –  j08691 Oct 29 '13 at 14:18
    
@j08691 sure, ill mark you in it –  ShawnWhite Oct 29 '13 at 14:19
    
@j08691 stackoverflow.com/questions/19661245/… –  ShawnWhite Oct 29 '13 at 14:38
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You can solve this problem in 2 ways. The one below is the easiest, using the index to increase the delay per item.

$('.banneritem').css('display', 'none');
$('.bannergroup').children('.banneritem').each(function( i ) {
  $(this).delay(4000 * i)).fadeIn().delay(4000 * (i+1)).fadeOut();               
});
share|improve this answer
    
This fades them all in right away and then fades them out 1 by one. I tried modifying it by adding delay(4000*(i-1) before the fade in, but the new one fades in before the other one has faded out. the 4000 delay does not take into account the fadeIn/fadeOut time. –  jpsnow72 Feb 16 '13 at 16:13
    
Updated my code. –  Niels Feb 16 '13 at 16:21
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