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I use this code to search and count vowels in the string,

a = "run forest, run";
a = a.split(" ");
var syl = 0;
for (var i = 0; i < a.length - 1; i++) {
    for (var i2 = 0; i2 < a[i].length - 1; i2++) {
        if ('aouie'.search(a[i][i2]) > -1) {
            syl++;
        }
    }
}

alert(syl + " vowels")

Obviously it should alert up 4 vowels, but it returns 3. What's wrong and how you can simplify it?

share|improve this question
    
I'm not native English speaking, so I might be wrong, but isn't y sometimes considered a vowel as well? –  Christofer Eliasson Feb 16 '13 at 17:20
    
Apparently y can be both an vowel and a consonant in English, depending on its use, which sounds like a tough nut to crack with a regular expression. More about it here. –  Christofer Eliasson Feb 16 '13 at 17:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this:

var syl = ("|"+a+"|").split(/[aeiou]/i).length-1;

The | ensures there are no edge cases, such as having a vowel at the start or end of the string.

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Are the | really necessary? If there is a vowel at the beginning/end/both, then the first/last/both element in array will be an empty string, but .length will count it. –  Oriol Dec 1 '13 at 18:01
    
@Oriol Hmm... I'm not entirely sure. You're right, they're not really needed... –  Niet the Dark Absol Dec 1 '13 at 18:56

Regarding your code, your if condition needs no i2

if('aouie'.search(a[i]) > -1){ 

I wonder, why all that use of arrays and nested loops, the below regex could do it better,

var str = "run forest, run";
var matches = str.match(/[aeiou]/gi);
    var count = matches ? matches.length : 0;
    alert(count + " vowel(s)");

Demo

share|improve this answer

Try:

a = "run forest, run";

var syl = 0;

for(var i=0; i<a.length; i++) {
        if('aouie'.search(a[i]) > -1){ 
            syl++;
        }
}

alert(syl+" vowels")

First, the split is useless since you can already cycle through every character.

Second: you need to use i<a.length, this gets the last character in the string, too.

share|improve this answer
    
In addition to this possible solution, i think you were finding number of WORDS with vowels intead of number of vowels –  ultraklon Feb 16 '13 at 17:20
    
He said that he counted the vowels in the string, not in individual words... –  Paul Feb 16 '13 at 17:21

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