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I know that fields stick to the objects as long as they exist, so they have some memory allocated, but what if I don't initialize some fields and don't use them? For example:

public class TEST {
   public static void main(String[] args) {
      Foo C = new Foo(5, 7);
      Foo D = new Foo(5);
      ...
}

public class Foo{
   private int A;
   private float B;

   public Foo (int A, float B){
      this.A = A;
      this.B = B;
    }
    public Foo (int A){
        this.A = A;
    }
    ...
}

Will C consume more memory than D?

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1  
This is not a good example, since both fields in question are primitives. –  Perception Feb 16 '13 at 17:51
    
:( basic java question –  Kanagavelu Sugumar Feb 16 '13 at 17:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Fields in Java are always initialized. Primitives are initialized to 0 or false, and references (and arrays) are initialized to null.

Furthermore, once you declare a field, that field will always take up the same space in every instance. References take up only as much space as a pointer, but the referred-to object might take extra memory.

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Initialize a reference to null or initialize it with a complex graph of instances may be radically different! –  Aubin Feb 16 '13 at 18:00
    
Well, that doesn't change the memory usage of the instance itself. Yes, if you have lots of reference fields sprouting huge object graphs, your memory usage will be high. That's what the last sentence is trying to say. –  nneonneo Feb 16 '13 at 18:01
    
+1 for this answer, taking account of my comment –  Aubin Feb 16 '13 at 18:02
    
@Aubin that depends on your definition of what-allocated-who, suppose two objects contain a reference to a 3rd object, would you say that both objects allocated the 3rd? (I wouldn't). –  Matthew Feb 16 '13 at 18:02
1  
@assylias: that would be...very weird. All instances of a class should take the same amount of memory, with the obvious exception of arrays. –  Louis Wasserman Feb 16 '13 at 18:53

The fact that you don't initialize a field inside a constructor, doesn't mean that they are not initialized.

When you create an instance of your class using new operator, the object is created and memory is allocated for the newly created instance, and all the instance fields of that class and all it's super classes, and they are initialized with their default values.

All this happens before your constructor is even invoked. So, yes in this case both C and D will have same memory allocated.

Now consider the case, where your fields are not primitive, but rather a reference to some other instance (Say, Integer rather than int). In that case, the default value for Integer is null. And if you initialize it for one reference C, and not for D, then the C reference will have more memory (The extra memory of the instance created for the reference field will be there.).

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1  
The fact whether they're initialized is irrelevant, even if it's not initialized to any value, they still have allocated memory. –  Matthew Feb 16 '13 at 17:51
    
@Matthew. That's the part of the object creation process. So can't skip that part from mentioning. –  Rohit Jain Feb 16 '13 at 17:54

First, a trivial comment on the style. The code looks Java to me. So all the variables should be lower case. Then, to your question, in your example, objects C and D consume the same amount of memory.

The fields are primitive types, one Foo object on the heap will take 4 bytes for int and another 4 bytes for float. Even if you do not initialize them, they will take the default values (set by the compiler).

To drill a bit deeper, a Foo object will consume 16 bytes exactly on a 32-bit JVM.

8 bytes for the header (object id, reference to the class object, lock, etc) and 8 bytes for the fields (int and float).

For more details, see this nice article.

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You can't actually guarantee that it is 16 bytes. JVMs are free to pick whatever object layout suits them. You can only guarantee that an object is a given size with reference to a particular JVM. –  nneonneo Feb 16 '13 at 19:36

Only new allocate memory. Sizeof( Foo ) is constant since it composed exclusively of primitive types.

If you add some attributes in Foo, of type object, the consumed size change if you allocate them or not.

public class Foo{
   private int A;
   private float B;
   private Date  C;

   public Foo (int A, float B){
      this.A = A;
      this.B = B;
      this.C = new Date();
    }
    public Foo (int A){
        this.A = A;
    }
    ...
}

public class TEST {
   public static void main(String[] args) {
      Foo C = new Foo(5, 7);
      Foo D = new Foo(5);
      ...
   }
}

In this case D consumes less memory than C.

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There's so much wrong with this... A lot of things may allocate memory; for example, calling a function most probably allocates some memory on "the" stack (or rather, on a stack). Primitive types have no relevance, references need memory too, and a constant amount of it too (the referenced objects may have varying sizes, but we must not confuse the two, as there will be numerous references to most objects). In the second sentence, you appear to confuse "allocate" with "use". –  delnan Feb 16 '13 at 17:56
    
Allocate means on the heap, we don't "allocate" permanently on the stack. –  Aubin Feb 16 '13 at 17:58
    
I don't know where you got that definition, but in every context I'm aware of, stacks are one way to allocate memory. Not usually very long (but quite possibly much longer than the allocating call; "stack" does not have to mean "the native/C stack") but occasionally for very long time, and either way the duration of the allocation doesn't have any bearing on the fact that it's a memory allocation. –  delnan Feb 16 '13 at 18:22

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