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I searched around and found some others with similar issues, but I can't seem to find a solution or clear explanation.

var content = 'test<br />';

for( var i = 1; i < 6; i++ ) {
    setTimeout(function() {
        document.write(content);
    }, 3000);
}

I'd like the code in the for loop to execute 5 times, with a three second delay between each loop. When it runs it, at least on the surface, looks like a three second delay at page load, then goes through all the loops with no delay.

What am I missing?

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marked as duplicate by pst, mplungjan, Donal Fellows, Julius, MByD Feb 17 '13 at 1:16

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5  
Multiply the 3 seconds with the counter. Also note that if you call document.write after the page has loaded –  mplungjan Feb 16 '13 at 18:59
    
As much of javascript is event based, it helps to think of setTimeout as triggering an event the given time in the future, and the function given as argument as a handler to that event (even though no event object is created). –  Clemens Klein-Robbenhaar Feb 16 '13 at 19:01
1  
Each of the callbacks is executed 3 seconds from when the loop is run. mplungjan suggested scheduling one at 3, 6, 9, etc. seconds .. –  user166390 Feb 16 '13 at 19:02
    
The basic explanation is that the loop executes very fast, so it sets up 5 functions to be executed roughly 3 seconds in the future. It doesn't wait for the future function to finish before going to the next iteration, it waits until the setTimeout call is completed - which is virtually immediately. –  Joe Dyndale Feb 16 '13 at 19:04
1  
Bergi - I appreciate you trying to be 'that guy' who needs call out a poster on not using the search function, but your are just making it more difficult for people who are looking for real help find what they need. Stop it. stackoverflow.com/questions/13774004/… codingforums.com/showthread.php?t=120951 –  Combobreaker Feb 16 '13 at 19:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your problem is that all the calls are happening after 3000 ms. Do perform each call 3s apart do this:

var content = 'test<br />';

for( var i = 1; i < 6; i++ ) {
    setTimeout(function() {
        document.write(content);
    }, 3000 * i);
}
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Thank you. I chose this answer because it required the least changing of the code I already had. Thank you to all who answered in the comments of my question. –  Combobreaker Feb 16 '13 at 19:19

You probably need to use setInterval ('cause you're trying to run code at a certain "interval")

// first create an isolated namespace because we don't need to dirty the global ns //
(function(){
  var counter = 0;
  var maxIterations = 6;
  var intervalReference = setInterval(function(){

    // your code goes here //
    alert('test');

    // the stop condition //
    ++counter;
    if (counter == maxIterations) {
      clearInterval(intervalReference);
    }
  }, 3000);
}())
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1  
No, there is no "probably need", although that is one [complicated for here] approach .. –  user166390 Feb 16 '13 at 19:05

setInterval is probably the way to go (see Alin's answer) but if you were wanting to go down the setTimeout route, the code would look something like this:

var loop = 0;
var content = "test<br>";

function startTimeout(init){
  if(init!==true){
    document.write(content);
    loop++;
  }

  if(loop<5){
    setTimeout(startTimeout, 3000);
  }
}

startTimeout(true);
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