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I have a query like:

SELECT (column LIKE 'string')+100

It returns ERROR: operator does not exist: boolean + integer

I couldn't find a function to convert bool to int, there is only text to int: to_number().

Is there a way to resolve this issue?

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1  
What do you want the boolean true or boolean false to be casted as? –  Gaurav Agarwal Feb 16 '13 at 19:18
    
Both, it depends on result of clause between (). I need to get integer - 0 or 1. –  Mansoor Feb 16 '13 at 19:23
1  
does (column like 'string')::integer + 100` work? otherwise use CASE WHEN .. THEN –  vol7ron Feb 16 '13 at 19:44
    
thanx a lot @vol7tron, ::integer worked well for me! :) –  Mansoor Feb 16 '13 at 19:49

4 Answers 4

I needed more portable solution, so this one suits me the best:

SELECT CAST((column LIKE 'string') AS integer)+100
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SELECT (column LIKE 'string')::integer +100
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Could you provide a reference for ::integer? –  Mansoor Feb 16 '13 at 20:33
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@Mansoor, check section 4.2.9 of docs. –  vyegorov Feb 16 '13 at 21:14

If you want to convert a string comparison to 1 when true and 0 when false, you could use a case statement:

select case when column like '%foo%' then 1 else 0 end as my_int from my_table;

If you wanted to add to that result, you would do something like:

select (case when column like '%foo%' then 1 else 0 end) + 100 as my_int from my_table;
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omg, is there something shorter? –  Mansoor Feb 16 '13 at 19:28
1  
I don't believe so, but if for some reason you find you need to do this kind of thing often, you could put it in a function: create function matches(text, text) RETURNS integer AS $$ select case when $1 like $2 then 1 else 0 end $$ LANGUAGE SQL; Then your sql would be select matches(column, '%foo%') + 100 from my_table –  skydump Feb 16 '13 at 19:39

Use Conditional Expressions, see http://www.postgresql.org/docs/9.2/static/functions-conditional.html

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