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I have file like below

H|ACCT|EXEC|1|TEMP|20130215035845|
849002|48|1208004|1
849007|28|1208004|1
855003|48|1208004|1
855004|28|1208004|1
855006|28|1208004|1
855008|28|1208004|1
855011|28|1208004|1

I want to add record count -1 (because first record is not the part of the hole records) I need output as below

H|ACCT|XEC|1|TEMP|20130215035845|
849002|48|1208004|1
849007|28|1208004|1
855003|48|1208004|1
855004|28|1208004|1
855006|28|1208004|1
855008|28|1208004|1
855011|28|1208004|1
T|7

I tried below option awk 'NF != 0 {++count} END {print count} But it is not writing at end of the file, how to calculate and add the result.

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What you have will certainly print the record count to its output. Do you want awk to write its output back to the input file? That's a different question (which has been answered many times!) –  William Pursell Feb 16 '13 at 19:28
    
Can't your write your trailer where the rest of the file is created? If you've already "lost" records by the time you do this, you just have a false sense of security by knowing how many records there are at this point in the processing. –  Bill Woodger Feb 17 '13 at 7:54
    
awk doesn't have in-place editing capabilities. But then again, you really don't need awk to do want you want. Please see my answer. HTH. –  Steve Feb 17 '13 at 8:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

try this line:

awk '1;END{print "T|"NR-1}' file

with your example:

kent$  echo "H|ACCT|EXEC|1|TEMP|20130215035845|
849002|48|1208004|1
849007|28|1208004|1
855003|48|1208004|1
855004|28|1208004|1
855006|28|1208004|1
855008|28|1208004|1
855011|28|1208004|1"| awk '1;END{print "T|"NR-1}'
H|ACCT|EXEC|1|TEMP|20130215035845|
849002|48|1208004|1
849007|28|1208004|1
855003|48|1208004|1
855004|28|1208004|1
855006|28|1208004|1
855008|28|1208004|1
855011|28|1208004|1
T|7
share|improve this answer

Use Built-In NR Variable

You don't need to use an explicit counter. You can use the built-in NR (number of records) variable. For example:

awk 'END { print NR-1 }' /path/to/file
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You really don't need awk. You can actually do this using coreutils and some nesting. You also avoid the need for temp files. Try:

echo "T|$(( $(wc -l < file) - 1 ))" >> file
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