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I'm using Postgres 9.1. I'm wondering if using multiple SELECT FOR UPDATES in the same transaction could potentially cause a race condition.

2 concurrent transactions:

transaction 1: select for update on table 1 -- successfully acquires lock

transaction 2: select for update on table 2 -- successfully acquires lock

transaction 2: select for update on table 1 -- waiting for lock release from transaction 1

transaction 1: select for update on table 2 -- waiting for lock release from transaction 2

What happens in this situation? Does one of the waiting transactions eventually time out? If so, is there a way to configure the timeout duration?

edit: is deadlock_timeout the configuration I am looking for?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, you should look for the deadlock_timeout in the docs.

But your scenario doesn't means that there will be a deadlock, 'cos PostgreSQL is using row-level locks and it is not clear whether your transactions are concurring for the same rows.

Another option is to use serialization level higher then default READ COMMITTED. But in this case your application should be ready to receive exceptions with SQLCODE=40001:

ERROR:  could not serialize access due to concurrent update

This is expected, you should just re-try transaction as is.

A very good overview of Serializable isolation level you can find on the wiki.

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PostgreSQL will detect the deadlock on step 4 and will fail the transaction. Here's what happened when I tried it in psql (only showing step 4):

template1=# SELECT * FROM table2 FOR UPDATE;
ERROR:  deadlock detected
DETAIL:  Process 17536 waits for ShareLock on transaction 166946; blocked by process 18880.
Process 18880 waits for ShareLock on transaction 166944; blocked by process 17536.
HINT:  See server log for query details.
template1=# 

This happens after 1s, which is the default timeout. The other answer has more information about this.

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