Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have to execute several SQL queries in different methods of same class. Is there any way to make these statements common and can i use the same con,statement variable in all the methods to execute queries.

Class.forName("com.mysql.jdbc.Driver").newInstance();
Connection con = DriverManager.getConnection ("jdbc:mysql://localhost:3306/kamal","root","root");
Statement statement=con.createStatement();
share|improve this question
    
What are you trying to accomplish? –  Sami Korhonen Feb 16 '13 at 20:25

5 Answers 5

use this method in your class and call it again and again

public Connection getMyConnection() throws ClassNotFoundException, SQLException
    {
        String connectionURL = "jdbc:mysql://localhost:3306/test";
        Class.forName("com.mysql.jdbc.Driver");
        Connection con = DriverManager.getConnection(connectionURL, "root", "root");
        return con;
    }
share|improve this answer

You could compose the connection statements in a static method, which can be re-used in your other classes:

public Connection getConnection() throws ClassNotFoundException, SQLException {

    String connURL = "jdbc:mysql://localhost:3306/test";
    Class.forName("com.mysql.jdbc.Driver");
    Connection con = DriverManager.getConnection(connURL, "username", "password");
    return con;
}

But this has has a disadvantage where you will have to manage the opening and closing of the database connection(s) manually.

To alleviate the above disadvantage, consider using an object relation mapping framework like Hibernate, which will abstract the connection details to a settings file that will be re-used for each database connection.

share|improve this answer
    
There's no reason to make the method static. –  Sami Korhonen Feb 16 '13 at 20:24
    
Right, I will edit that out. –  user626607 Feb 16 '13 at 20:26

If you require a variable throughout the class, you might want to make it a member variable.

However, this is discouraged for resources like Connections, because it can easily deprive a system, as well as put extra load.

What you can do is use a design pattern called Singleton. Read about it here.

Basically, you can create a new class called ConnectionManager with this implementation

class ConnectionManager {

private static ConnectionManager _instance = null;
private Connection con = null;

protected ConnectionManager() {
    //empty
}

private void init() {
    Class.forName("com.mysql.jdbc.Driver").newInstance();
    this.con = DriverManager.getConnection
          ("jdbc:mysql://localhost:3306/kamal","root","root");
}
public Connection getConnection() {
    return this.con;
}

public static ConnectionManager getInstance() {
    if(_instance == null) {
        _instance = new ConnectionManager();
        _instance.init();
    }
    return _instance;
}

}//end class

Now, this helps us in a number of ways, especially if your application is multi-threaded. We only need to make one connection, which will remain unless the program has been terminated. Everywhere you need to create a new Statement, you can simply use this.

ConnectionManager.getInstance().getConnection().createStatement();
share|improve this answer
    
I personally think it's a very bad idea to use connection as a singleton. In a multi-threaded environment there's no guarantee about thread safety. Connection pooling might be the right way to go. –  Sami Korhonen Feb 16 '13 at 20:39
    
A singleton made correctly is pretty thread-safe. Connection pooling is brilliant for very large applications, but is very cumbersome for smaller ones. –  Achrome Feb 16 '13 at 20:42
    
You shouldn't share a single connection between multiple threads. You can find discussion about thread safety here: stackoverflow.com/questions/1531073/… –  Sami Korhonen Feb 16 '13 at 20:46
    
That's interesting. But then, there's the JDBC spec here. docs.oracle.com/javase/1.3/docs/guide/jdbc/spec/… . It clearly states that the drivers have to be multi-thread safe. However, I will agree with you on the point that a singleton will reduce performance as it is shared across many threads. –  Achrome Feb 16 '13 at 20:50

Here's a very naive implementation of connection pooling. Be aware that this was written using notepad and it has not been tested:

public interface ConnectionPool {
    public Connection getConnection() throws SQLException;
    public void closeConnection(Connection connection) throws SQLException;
}


public class MySQLConnectionPool implements ConnectionPool {
    private static final Class<?> mysqlDriver;
    private final Stack<Connection> connections;
    private final String url;
    private final String user;
    private final String password;
    private final int maxSize;

    static {
        mysqlDriver = Class.forName("com.mysql.jdbc.Driver");
    }

    public MySQLConnectionPool(String url, String user, String password, int initialSize, int size) {
        if (initialSize > size) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("Pool initial size must not be greater than size");
        }
        if (size <= 0) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("Pool size must be greater than zero");
        }
        this.size = maxSize;
        this.url = url;
        this.user = user;
        this.password = password;

        this.connections = new Stack<Connection>();
        try {
            for (int i = 0;i < initialSize;i++) {
                connections.push(getConnection(url, user, password));
            }
        } catch (Exception exception) {
            // TODO: Log somewhere?
        }
    }

    public Connection getConnection(String url, user, password) throws SQLException {
        DriverManager.getConnection(url, user, password);
    }

    public Connection getConnection() SQLException {
        try {
            synchronized (connections) {
                return connections.pop();
            }
        } catch (EmptyStackException exception) {
            return getConnection(url, user, password);
        }
    }

    public void closeConnection(Connection connection) throws SQLException {
        synchronized (connections) {
            if (connections.size() < maxSize) {
                connections.push(connection);
                return;
            }
        }
        connection.close();
    }
}


public class SingletonMYSQLConnectionPool extends MySQLConnectionPool() {
    private static volatile SingletonMYSQLConnectionPool instance;

    private SingletonMYSQLConnectionPool() {
        super("jdbc:mysql://localhost:3306/kamal","root","root", 0, 2);
    }

    public static SingletonMYSQLConnectionPool getInstance() {
        if (instance == null) {
            synchronized (SingletonMYSQLConnectionPool.class) {
                if (instance == null) {
                    instance = new SingletonMYSQLConnectionPool();
                }
            }
        }
        return instance;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
What comes to reusing statements, that's something that you need to handle at application level (unless your container provides caching for them - but then you would be using DataSource) –  Sami Korhonen Feb 16 '13 at 21:19

Make them stored procedures in your database.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.