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I am refreshing my SQL.
I was reading about subqueries and the possibility to reference outside with correlated subqueries.
Example:

SELECT *  
FROM ORDERS O  
WHERE 'ROAD BIKE' =  
(SELECT DESCRIPTION FROM PART P WHERE P.PARTNUM = O.PARTNUM)  

This is equivalent with a join:

SELECT O.ORDEREDON, O.NAME,  
O.PARTNUM, O.QUANTITY, O.REMARKS  
FROM ORDERS O, PART P  
WHERE P.PARTNUM = O.PARTNUM AND P.DESCRIPTION = 'ROAD BIKE'  

My problem is that I didn't get the first form and when/why we use it. When are outside referenced queries useful?

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I guess you could make the argument that the former is clearer. –  Explosion Pills Feb 16 '13 at 21:05
    
You can also make the argument that the former is much much slower until SQL 6.0 –  Achrome Feb 16 '13 at 21:06
    
@ExplosionPills:Why is it clearer?I don't even understand how these queries work and where to apply them. –  Cratylus Feb 16 '13 at 21:06

3 Answers 3

Orders have a reference to the part number, so the Orders table has a foreign key to the part numbers.

We want all the Orders where the part number is for "Road Bike".

The first form first does a sub-query on every record, to check if O.PARTNUM is a part number for "Road Bike".

The way to think of it is, the main query is going through every record in the Orders table. On each record, it does a sub query, where it's PARTNUM field is used in the query. So, if you use the Orders record's PARTNUM in the sub-query, select to find the record in the PART table with that PARTNUM, and select the DESCRIPTION field. Then the where clause of the main query is check if "Road Bike" equals the DESCRIPTION returned from the sub-query.

I would recommend against using the first form, as it is a correlated query, and you should avoid correlated queries for performance reasons, so use the second form. A better version of the first form is:

SELECT *  
FROM ORDERS O  
WHERE O.PARTNUM =  
(SELECT P.PARTNUM FROM PART P WHERE DESCRIPTION = 'ROAD BIKE')

This is not a correlated query. The database can do the subquery once, get the PARTNUM for the record with "ROAD BIKE" as the DESCRIPTION, and then run the main query with the condition WHERE O.PARTNUM equals the result of the sub-query.

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Is there a use case that correlated sub query is the only way to go?I.e. solves some specific problem? –  Cratylus Feb 16 '13 at 21:35
    
The are some correlated sub-queries for which there is no other equivalent SQL without a correlated sub-query. Then it's unavoidable. –  Marlin Pierce Feb 16 '13 at 21:36
    
I mean it is not SQL one would write everyday let's say.It is corner case? –  Cratylus Feb 16 '13 at 21:37
    
Very rarely you could come upon the absolute need to write a subquery. I can think of a couple of scenarios, but not more than that. –  Achrome Feb 16 '13 at 21:38
    
Most queries are basically select * from one table. Maybe 90%. Not interesting SQL queries. Among the interesting queries, correlated queries, both avoidable and unavoidable are known pit falls, common enough to talk about. –  Marlin Pierce Feb 17 '13 at 12:49

In short, you should avoid correlated subqueries like the plague.

Correlated subqueries execute the inner query once for every row in the outer table. This results in terrible performance (a 1 million row outer table will result in the inner query executing 1 million times!)

A join on the other hand is quite efficient and databases are very good at optimising them.

If possible, always express your query as a join in preference to a correlated subquery.

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1)Is there a use case that correlated sub query is the only way to go? 2)Also is the performance difference among joins and correlated subqueries or joins and subqueries in general? –  Cratylus Feb 16 '13 at 21:34
    
Correlated subqueries will make a comeback with MySQL 6.0. –  Achrome Feb 16 '13 at 21:39
    
@AshwinMukhija:Not sure what you mean.I run the first form (which is a correlated subquery) in MySQL and it works –  Cratylus Feb 16 '13 at 21:57
    
Oh, I mean that correlated subqueries perform horrendously now. But with MySQL 6.0, the interpreter will auto convert the correlated subquery to a join wherever it can. –  Achrome Feb 16 '13 at 22:01

A scenario where a subquery might be appropriate is something like this:

select some fields
from some tables
where some conditions are met  
and somefield = (select min(something) from etc)

However, I don't know if that's a correlated subquery. Semantics aren't my strong point.

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Correlated subquery is when your subquery references part of your outer query.In my example notice WHERE P.PARTNUM = O.PARTNUM. The table O is defined outside. –  Cratylus Feb 16 '13 at 22:23

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