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In C++11 when a preprocessing directive of the form...

#if expr

...is encountered,expr is evaluated as a constant-expression as described in 16.1 [cpp.cond].

This is done after macro replacement on expr, its identifiers (and keywords) are replaced by 0, its preprocessing-tokens are converted to tokens, defined operator is evaluated, and so on.

My question is what happens when one of the tokens in expr is a user-defined-literal?

User defined literals are like function calls, but function calls can't occur in expr (I think), as a side effect of the identifier replacement. However technically user-defined-literals could survive.

I suspect it is an error, but I can't quite see how to conclude that from the standard?

Perhaps the (pedantic) impact of adding user defined literals on clause 16 [cpp] was simply ignored?

Or am I missing something?

Update:

To clarify by an example:

What does this preprocess to:

#if 123_foo + 5.5 > 100
bar
#else
baz
#endif

bar or baz or is it an error?

GCC 4.7 reports:

test.cpp:1:5: error: user-defined literal in preprocessor expression

so it thinks it is an error. Can this be justified with reference to the standard? Or is this just "implicit"?

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The preprocessor's notion of "constant expression" is quite different that that of C++, I believe. You can really only use literals and macros that expand to literals eventually... at least that's how I always understood it. –  Kerrek SB Feb 16 '13 at 21:30
    
Looks like your version of g++ is missing something, not you. –  Ben Voigt Feb 17 '13 at 0:05
1  
I doubt it was the intent of the committee to allow this sort of thing, since the logic of preprocessing and language semantics have always been so separated. But yeah, the Standard does seem to imply it should be handled. –  aschepler Feb 17 '13 at 0:08
    
I'm not positive, but I think this is the first significant divergence between the C and C++ preprocessing behaviors (which does not bode well for header files using #if __cplusplus). –  Ben Voigt Feb 17 '13 at 0:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In C++11 when a preprocessing directive of the form... #if expr ...is encountered, expr is evaluated as a constant-expression as described in 16.1 [cpp.cond].

This is done after macro replacement on expr, its identifiers (and keywords) are replaced by 0, its preprocessing-tokens are converted to tokens, defined operator is evaluated, and so on.

My question is what happens when one of the tokens in expr is a user-defined-literal?

The program is ill-formed.

The core of my argument is gleaned from the observation in 16.1/1 footnote 147, that in translation phase 4 there are no identifiers other than macro names yet.

Argument:

According to 2.14.8 [lex.ext]/2

A user-defined-literal is treated as a call to a literal operator or literal operator template (13.5.8).

So here we have a remaining call to an (operator) function even after all the substitutions described in 16.1/4. (Other attempts, for example to use a constexpr function, would be thwarted by the substitution of all non-macro identifiersby 0.)

As this occurs in translation phase 4, there are no defined or even declared functions yet; an attempted lookup of the literal-operator-id must fail (see footnote 147 in 16.1/1 for a similar argument).

From a slightly different angle, looking at 5.19/2we find:

A conditional-expression is a core constant expression unless it involves one of the following as a potentially evaluated subexpression (3.2) [...]:

  • [...]
  • an invocation of a function other than a constexpr constructor for a literal class or a constexpr function;
  • an invocation of an undefined constexpr function or an undefined constexpr constructor [...];

From this, use of a user-defined literal in a constant expression requires a defined and constexpr literal operator, which again can't be available in translation phase 4.

gcc is right to reject this.

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In C++11 when a preprocessing directive of the form #ifdef expr is encountered, expr is evaluated as a constant-expression as described 16.1. This is done after macro replacement on expr, its identifiers (and keywords) are replaced by 0, its preprocessing-tokens are converted to tokens, defined operator is evaluated, and so on.

No!

The argument to #ifdef, #ifndef, or defined is not evaluated. For example, suppose I never #define the preprocessor symbol SYMBOL_THAT_IS_NEVER_DEFINED. This is perfectly valid:

#ifdef SYMBOL_THAT_IS_NEVER_DEFINED
code
#endif

Expanding a symbol that symbol isn't defined is illegal. This is illegal assuming SYMBOL_THAT_IS_NEVER_DEFINED hasn't been defined:

#if SYMBOL_THAT_IS_NEVER_DEFINED
code
#endif

Analogous to checking whether a pointer is non-null before dereferencing it, checking whether a symbol is defined before using it is legal:

#if (defined SYMBOL_THAT_MIGHT_BE_DEFINED) && SYMBOL_THAT_MIGHT_BE_DEFINED
code
#endif
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Sorry I made a typo in the question, I meant #if expr, not #ifdef expr. I have corrected the question, please adjust your answer appropriately. –  Andrew Tomazos Feb 16 '13 at 23:23
    
Also note that expr in my question represents a whole series of tokens matching a constant-expression - and not the single identifier expr. –  Andrew Tomazos Feb 16 '13 at 23:46
    
See "Update" in question –  Andrew Tomazos Feb 16 '13 at 23:48
1  
What do you mean "No!"? You're arguing with the Standard. Also, the rest of your answer is wrong too. -1 –  Ben Voigt Feb 16 '13 at 23:54
1  
@David: Everything from the word "Expanding" onward is 100% incorrect. –  Ben Voigt Feb 18 '13 at 4:45

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