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From this blog :

All you need to do is to

  1. keep your old app foo.war untouched

  2. name your new version of app to foo##0001.war and upload to webapps folder

The old session will use foo.war, and new user will use foo##0001.war.

Is that the best way to deploy a new version of your app without restarting the webserver ?And is the string literally correct, myApp.war would be replaced with myApp##0001.war, the string seems rather unusual.

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Note: unless you've completely solved all of the memory leaks that lead to exhausting PermGen space upon redeploy, hot deploy will soon bring your server to a grinding halt. –  Ryan Stewart Feb 16 '13 at 22:01

1 Answer 1

According to the Tomcat 7 documentation:

The version component is treated as a String both for performance reasons and to allow flexibility in versioning schemes. String comparisons are used to determine version order. If version is not specified, it is treated as the empty string. Therefore, foo.war will be treated as an earlier version than foo##11.war and foo##11.war will be treated as an earlier version than foo##2.war. If using a purely numerical versioning scheme it is recommended that zero padding is used so that foo##002.war is treated as an earlier version than foo##011.war.

So the string although unconventional seem to be what is expected.

But I was wondering: from Tomcat management you can deploy/undeploy web applications without restarting Tomcat. Can't you use that?

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Using tomcat manager, will that maintain sessions ... ? Ie people will not get chucked off, but new visters will use new version ? –  NimChimpsky Feb 17 '13 at 8:19
    
So you problem is not to restart tomcat.Is to keep your web application responsive?Well in that case you can't use tomcat manager.You are right. –  Cratylus Feb 17 '13 at 10:15
    
whats the benefit of using tomcat manager if it doesn't maintain sessions/keep site responsive ? –  NimChimpsky Feb 17 '13 at 10:40
    
It is for administration purposes.It doesn't suite what you seem to need (no downtime on redeploying an application) –  Cratylus Feb 17 '13 at 11:24

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