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Goal

My goal is to quickly create a file from a large binary string (a string that contains only 1 and 0).

Straight to the point

I need a function that can achieve my goal. If I am not clear enough, please read on.

Example

Test.exe is running...
.
Inputted binary string:
        1111111110101010
Writing to: c:\users\admin\desktop\Test.txt
        Done!
File(Test.txt) In Byte(s):
        0xFF, 0xAA
.
Test.exe executed successfully!

Explanation

  • First, Test.exe requested the user to input a binary string.
  • Then, it converted the inputted binary string to hexadecimal.
  • Finally, it wrote the converted value to a file called Test.txt.

I've tried

As an fail attempt to achieve my goal, I've created this simple (and possibly horrible) function (hey, at least I tried):

void BinaryStrToFile( __in const char* Destination,
                      __in std::string &BinaryStr )
{
    std::ofstream OutputFile( Destination, std::ofstream::binary );

    for( ::UINT Index1 = 0, Dec = 0;
         // 8-Bit binary.
         Index1 != BinaryStr.length( )/8;

         // Get the next set of binary value.
         // Write the decimal value as unsigned char to file.
         // Reset decimal value to 0.
         ++ Index1, OutputFile << ( ::BYTE )Dec, Dec = 0 )
    {
        // Convert the 8-bit binary to hexadecimal using the
        // positional notation method - this is how its done:
        // http://www.wikihow.com/Convert-from-Binary-to-Decimal
        for( ::UINT Index2 = 7, Inc = 1; Index2 + 1 != 0; -- Index2, Inc += Inc )
            if( BinaryStr.substr( Index1 * 8, 8 )[ Index2 ] == '1' ) Dec += Inc;
    }
    OutputFile.close( );
};

Example of usage

#include "Global.h"

void BinaryStrToFile( __in const char* Destination,
                      __in std::string &BinaryStr );

int main( void )
{
    std::string Bin = "";

    // Create a binary string that is a size of 9.53674 mb
    // Note: The creation of this string will take awhile.
    // However, I only start to calculate the speed of writing
    // and converting after it is done generating the string.
    // This string is just created for an example.
    std::cout << "Generating...\n";
    while( Bin.length( ) != 80000000 )
        Bin += "10101010";

    std::cout << "Writing...\n";
    BinaryStrToFile( "c:\\users\\admin\\desktop\\Test.txt", Bin );

    std::cout << "Done!\n";
#ifdef IS_DEBUGGING
    std::cout << "Paused...\n";
    ::getchar( );
#endif

    return( 0 );
};

Problem

Again, that was my fail attempt to achieve my goal. The problem is the speed. It is too slow. It took more than 7 minutes. Are there any method to quickly create a file from a large binary string?

Thanks in advance,

CLearner

share|improve this question
5  
Have you measured how much time it costs you to create the string? This could be a rather large part of your 7 minutes... –  Axel Feb 16 '13 at 22:30
    
Yeah, this should rather be done using a bunch of uint64_ts instead of std::strings. –  user529758 Feb 16 '13 at 22:33
    
@Axel Yes I have. The speed of creating the string sure did took awhile. But I am not worried about that. Because, its not my goal. I only created that string to show an example. I won't be creating a string. I measured the time after its done creating the binary string. –  CLearner Feb 16 '13 at 22:37
    
@H2CO3 If you can show an example, that would be great! :) –  CLearner Feb 16 '13 at 22:38
1  
@CLearner Done. –  user529758 Feb 16 '13 at 22:46

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I'd suggest removing the substr call in the inner loop. You are allocating a new string and then destroying it for each character that you process. Replace this code:

for(::UINT Index2 = 7, Inc = 1; Index2 + 1 != 0; -- Index2, Inc += Inc )
    if( BinaryStr.substr( Index1 * 8, 8 )[ Index2 ] == '1' )
        Dec += Inc;

by something like:

for(::UINT Index2 = 7, Inc = 1; Index2 + 1 != 0; -- Index2, Inc += Inc )
    if( BinaryStr[Index1 * 8 + Index2 ] == '1' )
        Dec += Inc;
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent suggestion! –  CLearner Feb 16 '13 at 23:02

The majority of your time is spent here:

   for( ::UINT Index2 = 7, Inc = 1; Index2 + 1 != 0; -- Index2, Inc += Inc )
        if( BinaryStr.substr( Index1 * 8, 8 )[ Index2 ] == '1' ) Dec += Inc;

When I comment that out the file is written in seconds. I think you need to finetune your conversion.

share|improve this answer
    
Did it output the correct bytes? –  CLearner Feb 16 '13 at 22:55
    
@CLearner Of course it didn't! But that kind of experiment can be very valuable to identifying where the bottleneck is. –  Zack Feb 16 '13 at 22:56
    
@Zack Yet this answer is incomplete. –  user529758 Feb 16 '13 at 22:56
    
@H2CO3 No doubt, but it may be more educational than either my answer or yours. –  Zack Feb 16 '13 at 22:58
    
@Zack Why? I don't know what your intention was, but my answer surely does point out the bottleneck as well. –  user529758 Feb 16 '13 at 22:58

I think I'd consider something like this as a starting point:

#include <bitset>
#include <fstream>
#include <algorithm>

int main() { 
    std::ifstream in("junk.txt", std::ios::binary | std::ios::in);
    std::ofstream out("junk.bin", std::ios::binary | std::ios::out);

    std::transform(std::istream_iterator<std::bitset<8> >(in),
                   std::istream_iterator<std::bitset<8> >(),
                   std::ostream_iterator<unsigned char>(out),
                   [](std::bitset<8> const &b) { return b.to_ulong();});
    return 0;
}

Doing a quick test, this processes an input file of 80 million bytes in about 6 seconds on my machine. Unless your files are much larger than what you've mentioned in your question, my guess is this is adequate speed, and the simplicity is going to be hard to beat.

share|improve this answer

Something not entirely unlike this should be significantly faster:

void
text_to_binary_file(const std::string& text, const char *fname)
{
    unsigned char wbuf[4096];  // 4k is a good size of "chunk to write to file"
    unsigned int i = 0, j = 0;
    std::filebuf fp;           // dropping down to filebufs may well be faster
                               // for this problem
    fp.open(fname, std::ios::out|std::ios::trunc);
    memset(wbuf, 0, 4096);

    for (std::string::iterator p = text.begin(); p != text.end(); p++) {
        wbuf[i] |= (1u << (CHAR_BIT - (j+1)));
        j++;
        if (j == CHAR_BIT) {
            j = 0;
            i++;
        }
        if (i == 4096) {
            if (fp.sputn(wbuf, 4096) != 4096)
                abort();
            memset(wbuf, 0, 4096);
            i = 0;
            j = 0;
        }
    }
    if (fp.sputn(wbuf, i+1) != i+1)
        abort();
    fp.close();
}

Proper error handling left as an exercise.

share|improve this answer

So instead of converting back and forth between std::strings, why not use a bunch of machine word-sized integers for fast access?

const size_t bufsz = 1000000;

uint32_t *buf = new uint32_t[bufsz];
memset(buf, 0xFA, sizeof(*buf) * bufsz);
std::ofstream ofile("foo.bin", std::ofstream::binary);

int i;
for (i = 0; i < bufsz; i++) {
    ofile << hex << setw(8) << setfill('0') << buf[i];
    // or if you want raw binary data instead of formatted hex:
    ofile.write(reinterpret_cast<char *>(&buf[i]), sizeof(buf[i]));
}

delete[] buf;

For me, this runs in a fraction of a second.

share|improve this answer
1  
I think the OP wants their spelled-out binary string to be converted to actual binary, not hexadecimal-in-ASCII. –  Zack Feb 16 '13 at 22:47
1  
@Zack Updated for that as well. –  user529758 Feb 16 '13 at 22:56
    
How would you apply this to a standard string? Forgive me if this sounds like a stupid question. I could see the you used memset to set all cells/elements within the buffer to 0xFA. –  CLearner Feb 16 '13 at 23:10
    
@CLearner The point is that you don't use strings, because they are exepensive. –  user529758 Feb 17 '13 at 5:25

Even though late, I want to place my example for handling such strings. Architecture specific optimizations may use unaligned loads of chars into multiple registers for 'squeezing' out the bits in parallel. This untested example code does not check the chars and avoids alignment and endianness requirements. It assumes the characters of that binary string to represent contiguous octets (bytes) with the most significant bit first, not words and double words, etc., where their specific representation in memory (and in that string) would require special treatment for portability.

//THIS CODE HAS NEVER BEEN TESTED! But I hope you get the idea.

//set up an ofstream with a 64KiB buffer
std::vector<char> buffer(65536);
std::ofstream ofs("out.bin", std::ofstream::binary|std::ofstream::out|std::ofstream::trunc);
ofs.rdbuf()->pubsetbuf(&buffer[0],buffer.size());

std::string::size_type bits = Bin.length();
std::string::const_iterator cIt = Bin.begin();

//You may treat cases, where (bits % 8 != 0) as error

//Initialize with the first iteration
uint8_t byte = uint8_t(*cIt++) - uint8_t('0');
byte <<= 1;
for(std::string::size_type i = 1;i < (bits & (~std::string::size_type(0x7)));++i,++cIt)
{
    if(i & 0x7) //bit 7 ... 1
    {
        byte |= uint8_t(*cIt) - uint8_t('0');
        byte <<= 1;
    }
    else //bit 0: write and advance to the the next most significant bit of an octet
    {
        byte |= uint8_t(*cIt) - uint8_t('0');
        ofs.put(byte);

        //advance
        ++i;
        ++cIt;
        byte = uint8_t(*cIt) - uint8_t('0');
        byte <<= 1;
    }
}

ofs.flush();
share|improve this answer

This make a 76.2 MB (80,000,000 bytes) file of 1010101010101......

#include <stdio.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>

using namespace std;

int main( void )
{
    char Bin=0;
    ofstream myfile;
    myfile.open (".\\example.bin", ios::out | ios::app | ios::binary);
    int c=0;
    Bin = 0xAA;
    while( c!= 80000000 ){
        myfile.write(&Bin,1);
        c++;
    }
    myfile.close();
    cout << "Done!\n";
    return( 0 );
};

Here is the file first bytes

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