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EDIT: I really appreciate everyone's input. I gained something from all the responses and learned a good deal about OOD.

I am making a simple virtual tabletop war game. To represent units on the battlefield I have the following simple class hierarchy: An abstract class Unit, and two derived classes, Troop and Vehicle.

I have another class that has a hashtable for all the units in the game. The hashtable values are of Unit type, so I can reference them in O(1) time.

For the most part, this is fine, but sometimes the caller NEEDS to know if something is a troop or a vehicle to call specific methods from those derived classes. To accommodate for this, I've created two get methods that will enforce the types:

  public Troop getTroop(String uniqueID) {
    Unit potentialTroop = get(uniqueID);
    if(potentialTroop instanceof Vehicle) {
      throw new InternalError();
    }
    return (Troop) potentialTroop;
  }

  public Vehicle getVehicle(String uniqueID) {
    Unit potentialVehicle = get(uniqueID);
    if(potentialVehicle instanceof Troop) {
      throw new InternalError();
    }
    return (Vehicle) potentialVehicle;
  }

(Note the class for which this belongs merely extends Hashtable, so the get method being used here is the Java's hashtable's get method.)

So I think this is poor OOD design because if I ever further extend unit I'm going to have to add more checks and more #get methods to this hashtable.

Am I correct in saying this? Does anyone have alternative OOD suggestions if this is the case?

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closed as not constructive by Brian Roach, DaveShaw, Sankar Ganesh, Kuf, gnat Feb 17 '13 at 8:17

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how do you get the ids? you know the type of a specific uniqueID when calling getVehicle or getTroop? Or you try and catch? (I'm not very familiar with Java) –  Valentin Radu Feb 17 '13 at 0:46
    
Every unit is given a unique ID upon creation. But the unique ID's do not tell me if something is a vehicle or troop, I have to use instanceof for that. –  Slims Feb 17 '13 at 0:49

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's a simple way to do this, not necessarily the best, but it meets these requirements:

  1. Be able to dynamically obtain a specialized type from your Unit collection
  2. Be able to add additional Unit types later on, without having to add a bunch of handler methods.

The solution uses a 'template' class to perform matching:

@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
public <T extends Unit> T getSpecializedUnitType(Class<T> unitTypeClass, String uniqueID) {
    Unit potentialTroop = units.get(uniqueID);
    if(potentialTroop == null) return null;

    return potentialTroop.getClass().equals(unitTypeClass) ?
        (T) potentialTroop : null;
}

I made the assumption that you are going to correct your code, to not extend from Map, but rather to encapsulate it.

share|improve this answer
    
This is great and probably what I should be doing. –  Slims Feb 17 '13 at 0:52
    
How is this different than the original code, other than being parameterized so it doesn't have to be repeated? It's still doing type checks and downcasts. –  Ryan Stewart Feb 17 '13 at 0:59
1  
1) It's one method, as versus one-per-specialized-type. 2) Its doing a safe cast, because the retrieved map value is checked against the supplied class type. Its ... quite different in my opinion. –  Perception Feb 17 '13 at 1:00
1  
Nice solution. I'd just add one thing. It doesn't cater for subclasses of the passsed in class type. You could use Class.isAssignableFrom instead of class.equals(). –  Kevin Stembridge Feb 17 '13 at 1:22
1  
@KevinStembridge - thanks. I actually posted the sample code based on the assumption it should do an exact match. Using isAssignable is a great addition though, if the OP decides he wants to class/subclass matching. –  Perception Feb 17 '13 at 1:27

I would not extend HashTable (or any other class) in this case. Your class could use a HashTable internally, but by extending it you expose a lot of public API. The less you expose the better. You should generally favour composition over inheritance.

You would then have more flexibility in how you store the objects. In your case, you could have 3 maps internally; one containing all units, one just for Troops and one just for Vehicles. A given Unit would be stored in two maps, so you'd have to synchronize the adding and removing of Units to ensure integrity between the various maps.

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But wouldn't I have to have 'instaceof' stuff everywhere still? Like my put method would take a unit and the key, and it would place a unit in the Unit table, then it would have to check what type it was to place it in either the vehicle or troop table. Is this an improvement over my initial design? –  Slims Feb 17 '13 at 0:37
1  
I fail to understand how is this different from what the OP is already doing (at the conceptual level). If he is to add a new unit type, he also needs to add a new map(in his case he needed to add a new accessor method). Also, synchronising your objects between maps strikes me like a very bad idea. I wouldn't like to be the one debugging such thing. One single map and 3 different accessor methods for each unit type sounds better, but still, conceptually that's exactly the same thing the OP is doing right now. –  Valentin Radu Feb 17 '13 at 0:40
    
Hi Slims, if your code NEEDS to know the type in order to call specific methods then there is no way around doing an instanceof check somewhere. You've got a choice of doing that in the caller or the called. If it can be done in the called class that is better because you don't have to repeat it in potentially multiple callers. Others have suggested using polymorphic methods, which is a great idea if possible but your original question made it sound like that was not an option. –  Kevin Stembridge Feb 17 '13 at 0:54
    
Hi Valentin, I think you're right. One map would be better in this case. –  Kevin Stembridge Feb 17 '13 at 1:02

This getVehicle() and getTroops() is almost like a chain of if(elem instanceof X) statements, except it has exceptions. I hate that kind of chain, but in this case I would prefer that, and leave the hash table alone.

BUT if the specific methods you need to call could be considered "specific behaviour" of Vehicle or Troop, then you should consider putting them in an abstract method in class Unit, and override it in each class. If this is not the case, please provide more information about what you need to do with your Unit, so we can find a nice generalization.

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Well one example is: Vehicles have transportCapacity as a data member, and I need a getter for it. So I could put getTransportCapacity in Unit as an abstract method and override it in both classes, and have it always return 0 for troop. Is this sort of thing good design? –  Slims Feb 17 '13 at 0:46
    
No, getTransportCapacity should not be in Unit. Then what do you need that capacity for? And what would you do with a Troop in the same part of the code? –  Nannuo Lei Feb 17 '13 at 1:02
    
I'm not sure yet, unfortunately. I haven't gotten that far so I can't get more specific. Thanks for the input though, I will keep it in mind as I keep designing and coding. –  Slims Feb 17 '13 at 1:14
    
Since it's a tabletop game I guess there are two possibilities: 1) you're trying to validate whether an action by a player is valid, or 2) you are updating the Unit status after the action took place. In this case, this specific stuff could be modeled with methods Unit.validateAction() and Unit.updateStatus(), which should be abstract in class Unit, and overriden in child classes. Good luck! –  Nannuo Lei Feb 17 '13 at 1:18
    
Ah, I hadn't thought of that; that is very insightful, thanks. –  Slims Feb 17 '13 at 1:26

This is a pretty common problem with class design, and unfortunately, there's not a single, good solution because the solution varies with the details of the problem. A better design than what you have now would be one where the type information and capabilities of each type are expressed through a common interface, like your Unit.

Here's a possibility that I think is better, though some would argue it's still not exactly good because of the methods that throw UnsupportedOperationException. I used Groovy to be more concise, but it's close enough to Java that you should get the idea. See if it meets your needs:

abstract class Unit {
    enum UnitType { TROOP, VEHICLE }
    abstract UnitType getType()
    TroopAbilities getTroopAbilities() {
        throw new UnsupportedOperationException('not a Troop') 
    }
    VehicleAbilities getVehicleAbilities() { 
        throw new UnsupportedOperationException('not a Vehicle') 
    }
}

interface TroopAbilities {
    void doTroopThing()
}

interface VehicleAbilities {
    void doVehicleThing()
}

class Troop extends Unit implements TroopAbilities {
    void doTroopThing() { println 'something troopy' }
    UnitType getType() { UnitType.TROOP }
    TroopAbilities getTroopAbilities() { this }
}

class Vehicle extends Unit implements VehicleAbilities {
    void doVehicleThing() { println 'something vehicle-ish' }
    UnitType getType() { UnitType.VEHICLE }
    VehicleAbilities getVehicleAbilities() { this }
}

List<Unit> units = [new Troop(), new Vehicle(), new Troop()]
for (Unit unit : units) {
    switch (unit.getType()) {
        case Unit.UnitType.TROOP:
            unit.getTroopAbilities().doTroopThing()
            break;
        case Unit.UnitType.VEHICLE:
            unit.getVehicleAbilities().doVehicleThing()
            break;
        default:
            throw new IllegalStateException(
                "New unit type that's not accounted for: " + unit.getType())
    }
}

Also, your life will be simpler if you make a clean break between interface and implementation, so the Unit should really be more like:

interface Unit {
    enum UnitType { TROOP, VEHICLE }
    UnitType getType()
    TroopAbilities getTroopAbilities()
    VehicleAbilities getVehicleAbilities()
}

abstract class AbstractUnit implements Unit {
    TroopAbilities getTroopAbilities() {
        throw new UnsupportedOperationException('not a Troop')
    }
    VehicleAbilities getVehicleAbilities() {
        throw new UnsupportedOperationException('not a Vehicle')
    }
}

Then your concrete unit types would extend AbstractUnit, and then you're properly using inheritance for code reuse and polymorphism to allow each subclass to react to messages in its own way. The only grey area is the get*Abilties() methods, but I can't think of a good way around those at the moment.

Update for less work: If you want to trim this down to the bare minimum and remove some of the extensibility options and the safety of the enum, you could get down to this:

interface Unit {
    abstract String getType()
    Troop asTroop()
    Vehicle asVehicle()
}

abstract class AbstractUnit implements Unit {
    Troop asTroop() {
        throw new UnsupportedOperationException('not a Troop')
    }
    Vehicle asVehicle() {
        throw new UnsupportedOperationException('not a Vehicle')
    }
}

class Troop extends AbstractUnit {
    void doTroopThing() { println 'something troopy' }
    String getType() { "troop" }
    Troop asTroop() { this }
}

class Vehicle extends AbstractUnit {
    void doVehicleThing() { println 'something vehicle-ish' }
    String getType() { "vehicle" }
    Vehicle asVehicle() { this }
}

List<Unit> units = [new Troop(), new Vehicle(), new Troop()]
for (Unit unit : units) {
    switch (unit.getType()) {
        case "troop":
            unit.asTroop().doTroopThing()
            break;
        case "vehicle":
            unit.asVehicle().doVehicleThing()
            break;
        default:
            throw new IllegalStateException(
                "New unit type that's not accounted for: " + unit.getType())
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
It seems like a lot of extra work though. If I ever extend Unit again, I will have to add to the Enum and everything. –  Slims Feb 17 '13 at 0:47
    
If you don't like the enum, you could ditch it and just use Strings for unit types. You can also remove the *Abilities interfaces and just stick with the Troop and Vehicle types, though that removes some flexibility. See my update for a shorter version. –  Ryan Stewart Feb 17 '13 at 0:56
    
I don't think this solution is great OOD. A superclass should not know anything about the subclasses that implement it. Using an enum or String to identify the type is redundant and less robust. The instanceof operator achieves the same purpose in a more robust way. Although the syntax of multiple if else statements is not very appealing. Also, there is no lack of flexibility by not using interfaces. If the interface doesn't have more than one implementation then it provides no value. You can always convert it to an interface later. –  Kevin Stembridge Feb 17 '13 at 1:18
    
@KevinStembridge: You could implement the Unit interface all in one, albeit monstrous, class, or at least you could before I removed the extra interfaces. I think that single points firmly refutes both the "no lack of flexibility" and "superclass knowing about subclasses" points. The instanceof operator doesn't achieve the same thing. Instead, it breaks polymorphism, which is the main way it's different from my solution and what I thought the OP was attempting to avoid by the question. –  Ryan Stewart Feb 17 '13 at 1:34
1  
@RyanStewart My point is, don't create interfaces just for the sake of it. The solution you posted gains no value by using interfaces because each interface only has one implementation and each class only implements one interface. If requirements change its very easy to convert a class to an interface but there's no point doing it before its necessary. –  Kevin Stembridge Feb 17 '13 at 2:15

Why not implement only one get method that returns Unit? I believe that if the two classes have very specific, different methods, then they don't have a lot in common, do they? The fact that you want them to be subclasses of Unit makes me think that their similarity is beyond the fact "they are objects with a position on the map". In this case, the "wrong" part would be giving the methods different names and calling them separately. A way to make things better would be

  • to return only Unit from the hashtable
  • as already suggested, to make comprehensive methods when possible, like behave(), move(), that could be common to both classes and could therefore be called without casting (even though they would do different things). Use the hierarchy you created! These methods would eventually call the small, modular methods you created before (that would now become private).
  • you don't always need to know the type of Unit, do you? Only when necessary (not solvable with the techniques mentioned above), delegate such work to what you defined as "the caller", which I don't believe is a single, fixed entity. In other words, perform a check on type only when you have to decide whether your Unit shoots with the rifle or not. When you want to perform common tasks, there is no need to anticipate such distinction.
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+1 I don't see any reason why not to delegate determine which type of Unit you're dealing with to calling code. It means that you're going to have to refactor all of the places that do that when you add a new type of Unit, but you have to do that anyway since conceptually, all of those places will be interested in the specifics of the new type. And it lets you quit worrying about refactoring the class that keeps track of Units. –  Kevin Feb 17 '13 at 5:04

I like the solution Perception gave, but I think it could be improved more. Here's my version:

public <T extends Unit> T getSpecializedUnitType(Class<T> unitClass, String id) {
    Unit unit = units.get(id);
    return unitClass.cast(unit);
}

No suppressed warnings, if unit is null, null is returned, if not, it is cast to the necessary type. If the type is wrong, ClassCastException is thrown.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice, I used this. Thanks! –  Slims Feb 17 '13 at 16:29

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