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What is the way to use 'grep' to search for combinations of a pattern in a text file?

Say, for instance I am looking for "by the way" and possible other combinations like "way by the" and "the way by"

Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

Awk is the tool for this, not grep. On one line:

awk '/by/ && /the/ && /way/' file

Across the whole file:

gawk -v RS='\0' '/by/ && /the/ && /way/' file

Note that this is searching for the 3 words, not searching for combinations of those 3 words with spaces between them. Is that what you want?

Provide more details including sample input and expected output if you want more help.

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This is not what I want really. I want to search for the phrase and its combinations as I asked in the question. –  Gökhan Sever Feb 17 '13 at 16:38

The simplest approach is probably by using regexps. But this is also slightly wrong:

egrep '([ ]*(by|the|way)\>){3}'

What this does is to match on the group of your three words, taking spaces in front of the words with it (if any) and forcing it to be a complete word (hence the \> at the end) and matching the string if any of the words in the group occurs three times.

Example of running it:

$ echo -e "the the the\nby the\nby the way\nby the may\nthe way by\nby the thermo\nbypass the thermo" | egrep '([ ]*(by|the|way)\>){3}'
the the the
by the way
the way by

As already said, this procudes a 'false' positive for the the the but if you can live with that, I'd recommend doing it this way.

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This is close to what I want, except it can find phrases like "by the thermometer" :) –  Gökhan Sever Feb 17 '13 at 16:38
    
You're right of course :). Updated the answer –  nemo Feb 17 '13 at 19:15

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