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This is my first time using stackoverflow so I'll try to not make a fool of myself right away haha. I just decided to pick up PHP because I'm getting tired of C++ and Java, plus I just installed Linux Mint 14 and decided I should pick up a new language with my new operating system (Aside from using Ubuntu every now and then I have almost exclusively used Windows up to this point).

So I set up my environment fine, and I can run all my PHP scripts via Terminal alright, but when I try to run the script in Chrome (I.E. file:///home/stitches/Programming/PHP/HelloWorld/hw.php) it downloads the PHP file instead of displaying it. I am pretty sure it's not any of my installations, because I use the file:/// method in Chrome to bypass the blocked C drive on my school's computers very frequently and whenever I click something in Chrome's directory browser-ish thing it downloads it (Except for certain file types). That being said, I don't have much Linux or PHP experience at all and it really could be anything. Also, when I run the test script (localhost/testphp.php) it runs fine and does not download.

Can anyone help me out? I would prefer to be able to test my scripts in my browser because that way I can test it out in the browser as well. I'm guessing I could just put all of my files in the same directory as testphp.php (Wherever that is. I'm not sure, but I'm sure I can find it) so I can access it via localhost, but I'd prefer to be able to organize my scripts in the directory they are currently in.

I do want to mention that I did run searches, and the few people that had similar issues to me ended up having different issues or the same issue caused by something else. Unless I'm searching with the wrong terms I can't find anything on this.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Also, when I run the test script (localhost/testphp.php) it runs fine and does not download. … I'm guessing I could just put all of my files in the same directory as testphp.php (Wherever that is. I'm not sure, but I'm sure I can find it) so I can access it via localhost, but I'd prefer to be able to organize my scripts in the directory they are currently in.

This is your answer. Loading them with file:// URLs downloads that file. Loading them through localhost runs them as code and then outputs correctly, just as testphp.php is doing.

As for organizing them in that directory, you could symlink them from your web hosts folder (where testphp.php is) and into the directory you would like them to be.

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Ugh, that's a pain. Well, thank you very much, after Dhaivat Pandya's response I had re-installed PHP and Apache2 several times and couldn't get it to work haha, so I'm glad it wasn't that. Well, again, thanks. I would upvote you, but I can't because I'm new here. –  stitches Feb 17 '13 at 2:09
    
I would try symlinking and see if that mitigates the pain. I know it’s inconvenient to not have them in an arbitrary folder but it makes sense when you upload them to a production server, back and forth. Thanks :) –  JoePasq Feb 17 '13 at 2:13

This is a server setup issue. Your server is not actually running your PHP before just serving it as a plain file to the browser. Check your server's documentation in order to set up PHP correctly.

If it is Apache, see this and this.

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The file:// protocol will always give you the contents of the file. What you want is for the web server to run PHP on the file and then give you the result.

It sounds like you've got the web server and php installed correctly, because you mentioned the localhost/testphp.php example is working.

Depending on your installation, testphp.php is probably in /var/www/. Try putting your hw.php file in the same place and you should find that localhost/hw.php works.

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Thanks! I wish Chrome didn't just jump to downloading with file://... Well having to put everything in /var/www/ kind of sucks, but I guess I'll have to do that. Thanks, I'd pick yours as the accepted answer, but JoePasq answered first. –  stitches Feb 17 '13 at 2:10
    
It's not Chrome! Any browser will do the same thing. And no, you don't have to put everything in /var/www. As JoePasq pointed out, you could "symlink", e.g. do ln -s /path/to/your/hw/directory /var/www/somename . This creates a "symbolic link" in your /var/www directory, which is called somename, and has the value /path/to/your/hw/directory. To see this do ls -l /var/www/somename. You ought then to be able to use e.g. localhost/somename/hw.php without moving your files. If not, try googling for FollowSymLinks. Good luck! –  dvijaz Feb 17 '13 at 2:24

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