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I am trying to understand a solution that I read for an exercise that defines a logarithmic time procedure for finding the nth digit in the Fibonacci sequence. The problem is 1.19 in Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs (SICP).

SPOILER ALERT: The solution to this problem is discussed below.

Fib(n) can be calculated in linear time as follows: Start with a = 1 and b = 0. Fib(n) always equals the value of b. So initially, with n = 0, Fib(0) = 0. Each time the following transformation is applied, n is incremented by 1 and Fib(n) equals the value of b.

   a <-- a + b
   b <-- a

To do this in logarithmic time, the problem description defines a transformation T as the transformation

a' <-- bq + aq + ap
b' <-- bp + aq

where p = 0 and q = 1, initially, so that this transformation is the same as the one above.

Then applying the above transformation twice, the exercise guides us to express the new values a'' and b'' in terms of the original values of a and b.

a'' <-- b'q + a'q + a'p = (2pq + q^2)b + (2pq + q^2)a + (p^2 + q^2)a
b' <-- b'p + a'q = (p^2 + q^2)b + (2pq + q^2)a

The exercise then refers to such application of applying a transformation twice as "squaring a transformation". Am I correct in my understanding?

The solution to this exercise applies the technique of using the value of squared transformations above to produce a solution that runs in logarithmic time. How does the problem run in logarithmic time? It seems to me that every time we use the result of applying a squared transformation, we need to do one transformation instead of two. So how do we successively cut the number of steps in half every time?

The solution from schemewiki.org is posted below:

 (define (fib n) 
   (fib-iter 1 0 0 1 n)) 
 (define (fib-iter a b p q count) 
   (cond ((= count 0) b) 
         ((even? count) 
          (fib-iter a 
                    b 
                    (+ (square p) (square q)) 
                    (+ (* 2 p q) (square q)) 
                    (/ count 2))) 
         (else (fib-iter (+ (* b q) (* a q) (* a p)) 
                         (+ (* b p) (* a q)) 
                         p 
                         q 
                         (- count 1))))) 

 (define (square x) (* x x)) 
share|improve this question
    
If you keep squaring a transformation, then you only have to apply it once to get 2^n transformations. – nneonneo Feb 17 '13 at 2:17
    
I can understand this for n=1 where applying a transformation twice is the same as squaring the transformation. How can I prove to myself that this also holds for n=3, for example? That is, what property establishes that ((T^2)^2)^2 is applying 16 transformations rather than applying the squared-transformation above successively three times for a total of six transformations? What am I missing? – Ankur Mahajan Feb 17 '13 at 2:31
    
Mathematically, ((T^2)^2)^2 = (T^4)^2 = T^8. (You multiply exponents together in repeated exponentiation, and this works even if the bases are functions rather than numbers). – nneonneo Feb 17 '13 at 2:45
    
Let me rephrase my question: how does applying the above transformation twice yields a squared transformation? – Ankur Mahajan Feb 17 '13 at 2:58

@Bill-the-Lizard provides a nice proof, but you are allowing yourself to be conflicted by what you think of the word "twice" and the word "square", in relation to transforms.

a) Computing twice the term T--that is, two-times-T--is a case of multiplication. The process of multiplication is simply a process of incrementing T by a constant value at each step, where the constant value is the original term itself.

BUT by contrast:

b) The given fibonacci transform is a process that requires use of the most current state of term T at each step of manipulation (as opposed to the use of a constant value). AND, the formula for manipulation is not a simple increment, but in effect, a quadratic expression (i.e. involves squaring at each successive step).

Like bill says, this successive squaring effect will become very clear if you step through it in your debugger (I prefer to compute a few simple cases by hand whenever I get stuck somewhere).

Think of the process another way:

To reach your destination if you could cover the square of the current distance in the next step, but still somehow manage to take a constant amount of time to complete each step, you're going to get there way faster than if you take constant steps, each in constant time.

share|improve this answer

The exercise then refers to such application of applying a transformation twice as "squaring a transformation". Am I correct in my understanding?

Yes, squaring a transformation means applying it twice or (as is the case in the solution to this exercise) finding another transformation that is equivalent to applying it twice.

How does the problem run in logarithmic time? It seems to me that every time we use the result of applying a squared transformation, we need to do one transformation instead of two. So how do we successively cut the number of steps in half every time?

Squaring the given transformation enables us to cut down the number of steps because the values of p and q grow much faster in the squared transformation than they do in the original one. This is analogous to the way you can compute exponents using successive squaring much faster than by repeated multiplication.

So how do we successively cut the number of steps in half every time?

This is in the code given. Whenever count is even, (/ count 2) is passed for count on the next iteration. No matter what value of n is passed in on the initial iteration, it will be even on alternating iterations (worst case).

You can read my blog post on SICP Exercise 1.19: Computing Fibonacci numbers if you want to see a step-by-step derivation of the squared transformation in this exercise.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, Bill. Why does applying a transformation twice equivalent to squaring it? I understood the problem that computes exponents in logarithmic time where a^n can be computed as a^(n/2) * a^(n/2) if n is even and a * a^(n-1) if n is odd and doing that iteratively until n is 1. If I can figure out why applying the transformation twice equals squaring it, I can see how the solution will be logarithmic. – Ankur Mahajan Feb 17 '13 at 3:54
    
@AnkurMahajan To really understand this, I'd suggest stepping through several iterations of the algorithm in a debugger and watch how the values a, b, p, and q increase as count decreases. – Bill the Lizard Feb 17 '13 at 4:04

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