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Im working with 2 List, i want to see if the main contains the same types. The 2 lists do not need to contain the same count or order, just have all of the matching Types. I know this is very possible with Linq, however i cannot use that.

    private static bool ContentsMatch(List<Type> list1, List<Type> list2)
    {
        if (list1.Count != list2.Count)
            return false;

        for (int i = 0; i < list1.Count; i++)
        {
            if (!list1[i].Equals(list2[i]))
                return false;
        }
        return true;
    }

The above method i tried will only return true if they are in the same order.

share|improve this question
    
Use a hashtable to collect the info. – leppie Feb 17 '13 at 2:23
    
Could you give me an example? – user2079647 Feb 17 '13 at 2:25
1  
Iterate through the first list, adding the types to the hashtable (value does not matter, key is the interest). Then loop through the second list check if the type is in the hashtable, then repeat the process with the 2 lists swapped. – leppie Feb 17 '13 at 2:28
2  
Could you explain why you can't use LINQ? – svick Feb 17 '13 at 2:44
1  
"The 2 lists do not need to contain the same count or order", but you write if (list1.Count != list2.Count) return false; – Matthew Feb 17 '13 at 2:48

Code for algorithm provided in the comments.

Does not depend on order or count or duplicate items. Also generic and abstracted.

bool IsSameSet<T>(IEnumerable<T> l1, IEnumerable<T> l2)
{
  return IsSubSet(l1, l2) && IsSubSet(l2, l1); 
}

bool IsSubSet<T>(IEnumerable<T> l1, IEnumerable<T> l2)
{
  var lookup = new Dictionary<T, bool>();

  foreach (var e in l1)
    lookup[e] = true;

  foreach (var e in l2)
    if (!lookup.ContainsKey(e))
      return false;

  return true;
}

Usage:

Type[] l1 = { typeof(object), typeof(int), typeof(long), typeof(object) };
Type[] l2 = { typeof(int), typeof(long), typeof(object) };

var result = IsSameSet(l1, l2);
Console.WriteLine(result);  // prints true

Exercise for the user:

Add an additional parameter to provide an IEqualityComparer<T> to be passed to the dictionary.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1. If lists are often different and passed in as IList<T> one can check lenght first (as in original code) if both arguments are Lists (or have additional version bool IsSameSet<T>(IList<T> l1, IList<T> l2) that checks length and than calls this one). – Alexei Levenkov Feb 20 '13 at 7:27

To compare any user defined customized types, we need to override Equals & GetHashCode. Below is the code snippet you could refer to :

    public class CustomizedDataType
    {
        private int field1;
        private string field2;

        public CustomizedDataType(int field1,string field2)
        {
            this.field1 = field1;
            this.field2 = field2;
        }

        public override bool Equals(object obj)
        {
            CustomizedDataType dataType = obj as CustomizedDataType;
            if (this.field1 == dataType.field1 && this.field2 == dataType.field2)
            {
                return true;
            }
            return false;
        }

        public override int GetHashCode()
        {
            return (this.field1.GetHashCode() + this.field2.GetHashCode());
        }

Sample code to execute :

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        //Test Data
        List<CustomizedDataType> dataTypeContaineer1 = new List<CustomizedDataType>();
        dataTypeContaineer1.Add(new CustomizedDataType(10,"Test10"));
        dataTypeContaineer1.Add(new CustomizedDataType(11, "Test11"));
        dataTypeContaineer1.Add(new CustomizedDataType(12, "Test12"));

        //Test Data
        List<CustomizedDataType> dataTypeContaineer2 = new List<CustomizedDataType>();
        dataTypeContaineer2.Add(new CustomizedDataType(100, "Test10"));
        dataTypeContaineer2.Add(new CustomizedDataType(11, "Test11"));
        dataTypeContaineer2.Add(new CustomizedDataType(12, "Test120"));

        //Checking if both the list contains the same types.
        if (dataTypeContaineer1.GetType() == dataTypeContaineer2.GetType())
        {
            //Checking if both the list contains the same count
            if (dataTypeContaineer1.Count == dataTypeContaineer2.Count)
            {
                //Checking if both the list contains the same data.
                for (int index = 0; index < dataTypeContaineer1.Count; index++)
                {
                    if(!dataTypeContaineer1[index].Equals(dataTypeContaineer2[index]))
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine("Mismatch @ Index {0}", index);
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }

Output :

enter image description here

share|improve this answer

You can use the C# keyword 'is' to see if an object is compatible with a given type. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/vstudio/scekt9xw.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
-1: Wrong answer. – leppie Feb 17 '13 at 2:44

Assuming you mean that that two List<T> both have matching T, you could use:

private static Boolean MatchingBaseType(IEnumerable a, IEnumerable b)
{
    return GetIListBaseType(a) == GetIListBaseType(b);
}

private static Type GetIListBaseType(IEnumerable a)
{
    foreach (Type interfaceType in a.GetType().GetInterfaces())
    {
        if (interfaceType.IsGenericType &&
            (interfaceType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(IList<>) ||
             interfaceType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(IEnumerable<>) ||
             interfaceType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(ICollection<>))
        )
        {
            return interfaceType.GetGenericArguments()[0];
        }
    }
    return default(Type);
}

You say count doesn't matter (though you're checking .Count()--why?) But this should return if the two lists have the same types in them.

share|improve this answer
    
According to the OP, this is not what he/she wants. – leppie Feb 17 '13 at 3:04
    
If you legitimately start with a List<Type>, then obviously this won't work; but the question seems ambiguous, so my apologies if I misunderstood. – Brad Christie Feb 17 '13 at 3:05
    
From what I can see, the OP refers to the actual Type class. – leppie Feb 17 '13 at 3:05
1  
@leppie: if you're so in-tune with OP, post an answer instead of commenting and telling everyone else where they've gone wrong. – Brad Christie Feb 17 '13 at 3:06
    
This is a simple set comparison. I gave the algorithm as a comment. Do I need to spoonfeed as well? If someone else wants the rep, they can go and implement it. – leppie Feb 17 '13 at 3:09

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