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This is a homework question so I would like help, not an answer.

I'm trying to create 2 triangles out of numbers based on a number entered by the user.

"Enter a number between 2-9: "3"
1
12
123

  1
 21
321

IE2:

"Enter a number between 2-9: "5"
1
12
123
1234
12345

    1
   21
  321
 4321
54321

I have been able to get the first triangle complete. But when I add my nested loop it messes up my first triangle with the numbers developed from the nested loop. It also puts all the numbers in a straight vertical line. I've tried variations for different nest loops and even tried messing with a StringBuilder, but was still unsuccessful. Here's what I have in code so far:

import java.util.Scanner;

public class NestedLoops
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);

        System.out.print("Enter a Number between 2-9: ");
        int width = input.nextInt();

        String r = "";
        for (int i = 1; i <= width; i++)
        {
            r = r + i;
            System.out.println(r);

        }

    }

}

Again, I'm looking for help/understanding and not just an answer.

share|improve this question
    
Please hover over the homework tag and read what it says there. –  Xymostech Feb 17 '13 at 3:30
    
do you need to use a nested loop for the assignment? You can solve this in two loops without nesting them or even 1 with some more complicated string manipulation. –  twain249 Feb 17 '13 at 3:32
    
@Xymostech, can't use school. suggestions? –  Ray Cheng Feb 17 '13 at 3:32
    
Thought of using printf ?? –  Arham Feb 17 '13 at 3:33
    
@RayCheng What do you mean? –  Xymostech Feb 17 '13 at 3:33

6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

try

    int width = 5;
    // for all lines; number of lines = width
    for (int line = 1; line <= width; line++) {
        // print numbers from 1 to current line number  
        for (int n = 1; n <= line; n++) {
            System.out.print(n);
        }
        // end of line
        System.out.println();
    }
    // add empty line between triangles
    System.out.println();
    // for all lines; number of lines = width
    for (int line = 1; line <= width; line++) {
        // printing padding spaces, number of spaces = with - line number
        int nSpaces = width - line;
        for (int i = 0; i < nSpaces; i++) {
            System.out.print(" ");
        }
        // print numbers from number of current line to 1
        for (int n = line; n >= 1; n--) {
            System.out.print(n);
        }
        // end of line
        System.out.println();
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Please disregard my last comment, I didn't see where you set line back to 1 in the 2nd for loop. –  SkyVar Feb 17 '13 at 4:09
    
this is Java rule: in for (int line = 1; line <= width; line++) {..}var line is visible only inside block {}. It is different from C++ –  Evgeniy Dorofeev Feb 17 '13 at 4:15

There are two aspects the 2nd part of the question.

  1. You need to generate strings with the numbers in the reverse order:

    • You could do this by adding the numbers at the other end.
    • You could do this by reversing the strings.
  2. You need to arrange that there are spaces to the left.

    • You could do this by adding the required number of spaces to the left end of the string.
    • You could do this by using the System.out.format(...) with a template that right aligns the string in a field with the required number of characters. (OK, that's a bit too obscure ...)

Or, you can build the string in a character array or string builder rather than using string concatenation.

The "trick" is to figure out what strategy you are going to use ... before you start cutting code.

share|improve this answer

Can you just add another loop after your first loop like

String r = "";
String space = "";
    for (int i = width; i >= 1; i--)
    {
        r = r + i;
        System.out.println(r);

    }

Try it. not yet tested

share|improve this answer

You need to use a queue. eg. http://docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/util/LinkedList.html

Enque the numbers till you reach the max, and then start dequing them.

And while you dequeue, you need to apply the reverse

Queue<String> q = new LinkedList<String>();
        for (int i = 1; i <= width; i++)
        {
            r = r + i;
            q.add(r);
            System.out.println(r);

        }

        while(!q.isEmpty()){
            String j = q.remove();
             //reverse j
            System.out.println(reverse(j));
        }

I leave the reversing part for you to do :)

share|improve this answer
    
Any chance you have an example of this you can show me? –  SkyVar Feb 17 '13 at 3:39
public static void main(String[] args)
{
    int n = 5;

    for(int i=1; i<=n; i++)
    {            
        for (int j=(n*2), k=n; j>1; j--) 
        {
            if (k <= i) 
            {
                System.out.print(k);
            } 
            else 
            {
                System.out.print('*');
            }

            k += (j)-1 > n ? -1 : 1;
        }

        System.out.println();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Just tried to implement in scala. Ignore if you don't like it..:-)

 class Triangle extends App
{
  val width = Console.readInt()

  if (width < 2 || width > 9)
  {
     throw new RuntimeException()
  }

  var i, j = 1;

  for (i <- 1 to width)
  {
     for (j <- 1 to i)
     {
        print(j)
     }
     print("\n")
  }

  for (i <- 1 to width)
  {
     for (dummy <- 1 to width-i)
     {
        print(" ")
     }
     for (j <- i to 1 by -1)
     {
       print(j)
     }
     print("\n")
  }
}
share|improve this answer

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