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I'm fairly new to c++ and am trying to learn about custom operators. The problem I'm having currently is in relation to defining my own += operator and the best way to go about it. This involves a simple class with a public int member (intValue) that can be added to. The following two code examples, which I've tried one at a time, operate exactly the same in my program as far as I can tell. By 'exactly the same' I mean I get the same result and create the same number of objects.

Which one is more correct (standard practice) and why?

Utility& operator +=(Utility& left, Utility right)
{
    return left = left + right;
}

Or

void operator +=(Utility& left, Utility right)
{
    left = left + right;
}

And, if it matters, the operator they call:

Utility operator +(Utility left, Utility right)
{
    return Utility(left.intValue + right.intValue);
}

The class prints out a message any time its constructor is called so I can tell if a new object is being made. Based on that the two forms of += I'm trying here result in the same number of objects being created.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since += normally modifies its left-hand operand, you'd generally rather not implement it in terms of operator+ (which needs to create a temporary value to hold the result).

Likewise, since you can't reasonably do a conversion on the left operand, it should really be a member function.

Utility &Utility::operator+=(Utility const &right) { 
    intValue += right.intValue;
    return *this;
}
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Thank you both for your replies, they both had something unique for me to learn. Is there any way to denote that both answers were useful? You can only check one. –  Katawa Tenshu Feb 17 '13 at 6:30
    
@KatawaTenshu: You can up-vote both. –  Jerry Coffin Feb 17 '13 at 7:24
    
Thank you, I'll do that in the future when I have the rep to do so. –  Katawa Tenshu Feb 17 '13 at 9:05

Generally, one would expect += to modify the left hand operand, it would be better if you avoid implementing it with operator + that results in creating a temporary value.

Besides,

Utility& operator +=(Utility& left, Utility right)
{
    return left = left + right;
}

is better than the other in the sense that it returns the result. This enables users to write compound expressions like:

Utility utility1 , utility2;
Utility ut += (utility1 += utility2);

But if you can modify the Utility internally without operator+, it would be better.

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