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I am generating a radio button list programatically in C#.NET 3.5 and using a RadioButtonList in order to do so. However, something I find very frustrating is the RepeatLayout property, which can only be set to Flow or Table.

Tables are for tabular data, not for displaying forms. And flow isn't helpful because it doesn't lend itself well to styling.

What I really want is a nest of divs I can address with CSS. Can this be done?

Some examples to illustrate what I'm talking about and example code below.

Example of flow

<span id="s1">
    <input id="s1_0" type="radio" value="Answer A" name="s1">
    <label for="s1_0">Answer A</label>
    <br>
    <input id="s1_1" type="radio" value="Answer B" name="s1">
    <label for="s1_1">Answer B</label>
</span>

Example of table

<table border="0" id="s1">
    <tbody>
        <tr>
            <td><input type="radio" value="Answer A" name="s1" id="s1_0"><label for="s1_0">Answer A</label></td>
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <td><input type="radio" value="Answer B" name="s1" id="s1_1"><label for="s1_1">Answer B</label></td>
        </tr>
    </tbody>
</table>

What I actually want

<div id="s1">
    <div>
        <input type="radio" value="Answer A" name="s1" id="s1_0">
        <label for="s1_0">Answer A</label>
    </div>
    <div>
        <input type="radio" value="Answer B" name="s1" id="s1_1">
        <label for="s1_1">Answer B</label>
    </div>
</div>

C# Code I'm using to generate the list

I know whatever the solution is, won't be as quick and easy as this, but I'm putting it here so you can get an idea of the context in which I'm using it.

RadioButtonList rbl = new RadioButtonList { RepeatLayout = RepeatLayout.Table };
foreach (ControlValue cv in MasterControl.listControlValues)
{
    rbl.Items.Add(new ListItem(cv.name, cv.value));
}
ControlContainer.Controls.Add(rbl);
share|improve this question
    
I also note that .NET 4.5 has Unordered List and Ordered List options, which is far better. But doesn't help me here :( (using 3.5) – Iain Fraser Feb 17 '13 at 6:20
    
if you want to restrict on radioButtonList I don't think it is possible to disaply list-item in seperate div's. But you can you individual radion-button with group name and set your each radio-button where you please – शेखर Feb 17 '13 at 6:39

You may want to use WebControlAdapter to change the way of how RadioButtonList is rendered.

Below is the complete code for your case:

public class RadioButtonListAdapter : WebControlAdapter
{
    protected override void RenderBeginTag(HtmlTextWriter writer)
    {
        writer.RenderBeginTag("div");
    }

    protected override void RenderEndTag(HtmlTextWriter writer)
    {
        writer.RenderEndTag();
    }

    protected override void RenderContents(HtmlTextWriter writer)
    {
        var adaptedControl = (RadioButtonList) Control;
        int itemCounter = 0;

        writer.Indent++;
        foreach (ListItem item in adaptedControl.Items)
        {
            var inputId = adaptedControl.ClientID + "_" + itemCounter++;

            // item div
            writer.RenderBeginTag("div");
            writer.Indent++;

                // input
                writer.AddAttribute("type", "radio");
                writer.AddAttribute("value", item.Value);
                writer.AddAttribute("name", adaptedControl.ClientID);
                writer.AddAttribute("id", inputId);

                if (item.Selected)
                {
                    writer.AddAttribute("checked", "checked");
                }

                writer.RenderBeginTag("input");
                writer.RenderEndTag();

                // label
                writer.AddAttribute("for", inputId);

                writer.RenderBeginTag("label");

                writer.Write(item.Value);

                writer.RenderEndTag();

            // div
            writer.Indent--;
            writer.RenderEndTag();
        }
        writer.Indent--;
    }
}

To connect this adapter to you application you have two options. First is to do it programmatically in page constructor:

var adapters = Context.Request.Browser.Adapters;
var radioButtonListType = typeof(RadioButtonList).AssemblyQualifiedName;
var adapterType = typeof(RadioButtonListAdapter).AssemblyQualifiedName;
if (!adapters.Contains(radioButtonListType))
{
    adapters.Add(radioButtonListType, adapterType);
}

Second option is using .browser file:

Add new Browser File to your project. It will reside in App_Browsers folder. Then replace contents with following declaration:

<browsers>
    <browser refID="Default">
            <controlAdapters>
                <adapter controlType="System.Web.UI.WebControls.RadioButtonList" 
                         adapterType="<your namespace>.RadioButtonListAdapter" />
            </controlAdapters>
    </browser>
</browsers>

As a reference you can use links from ScottGu's post ASP.NET 2.0 Control Adapter Architecture they can give a good basement in this topic.

Also there is an open source CSS Friendly Control Adapters project that adresses some of rendering issues of default ASP.NET controls.

share|improve this answer

I think that you should look for a workaround with CSS rather than changing the structure. Even I face some problems with this sort of structure but my designing team fixes it with ease.

share|improve this answer
1  
Yeah, that's what I'm going to do in this case, simply because of time constraints. The actual styling isn't the problem; it's easy enough to apply CSS to a table. The problem is that we're using a table to display something that isn't tabular data. It also presents an absolute nightmare for anyone using a screen reader. – Iain Fraser Feb 17 '13 at 6:18

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