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In a C-program, I use the line: printf("%c", WORD_SEP); which I think is self-explanatory.

As far as I understand, printf will parse the Format-String "%c" and replace it with the character WORD_SEP at runtime. This of course is completely avoidable because WORD_SEP is a compiler #define and will therefore never changes.

I could hardcode printf("*"); which will be faster, but of course I would like to keep the #define for maintainability - also it will still be not optimal because printf would still have to parse the string.

Is there a better way?

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4  
maybe putchar(WORD_SEP) is what you want –  Bryan Chen Feb 17 '13 at 6:25
1  
Actually, if you turn on aggressive optimizations, the compiler will optimize out this anyway and it will become putc(WORD_SEP);. –  user529758 Feb 17 '13 at 6:26
3  
I can't imagine the amount of 'faster' you're going to get out of this kind of optimization could possibly make a difference. Are you experiencing problems related to this question? –  Carl Norum Feb 17 '13 at 6:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Non-formatted single character printing:

putc(), putchar() and fputc()

Non-formatted string printing:

fputs(), and my (not-so-)favorite puts()

On a side note, avoid using "*" instead of '*' because, "*" creates a space in the memory with two bytes, one for * and the other for \0. Wherever you want 1 single character, use '*' instead of "*"

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The two bytes vs. one is rarely an issue these days, even on embedded systems. The more significant problem is that their types differ (char vs. char[2]), and this can lead to confusion. –  user529758 Feb 17 '13 at 6:33
    
@H2CO3 Amen to that. I just wanted the OP to think clearly –  Aniket Feb 17 '13 at 6:33
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No problem with what you said, just for the record :) My principle: "I rather write inefficient and readable code than efficient and unreadable code." –  user529758 Feb 17 '13 at 6:34
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@H2CO3: The good thing about doing that is that your compiler will take your readable unefficient code and make it more efficient than other people's unreadable "efficient" code. So you win on both grounds :) –  SecurityMatt Feb 17 '13 at 7:43
    
@SecurityMatt And after all, that's true :) –  user529758 Feb 17 '13 at 7:48

Hopefully I'm not misreading the question, but if you want to ultimately do something like

printf("abc %c xyz", WORD_SEP);

without actually having this constant word separator inserted at runtime, you could first do

#define WORD_SEP "*"

and then do

printf("abc " WORD_SEP " xyz");

which will result in the format string being created at compile time. As mentioned in the comments below, in this case you would need to be careful about having a % character in WORD_SEP since it's now part of the format string.

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#define WORD_SEP "%" // oh noes! –  SecurityMatt Feb 17 '13 at 7:41
    
Thanks @SecurityMatt, I've edited to include a disclaimer regarding %. –  808sound Feb 17 '13 at 13:04

As far as I understand, printf will parse the Format-String "%c" and replace it with the character WORD_SEP at runtime. This of course is completely avoidable because WORD_SEP is a compiler #define and will therefore never changes.

And gcc does optimize printf("%c", WORD_SEP); into a call to putchar('*'):

#include <cstdio>

#define WORD_SEP '*'

int main() {
    printf("%c", WORD_SEP);
}

Output asm:

g++ -S --verbose-asm -o - -DNDEBUG -g -Wall -Wextra -march=native -O3 test.cc | c++filt > test.s

test.s:

main:
    subq    $8, %rsp    
    movl    $42, %edi   
    call    putchar 
    xorl    %eax, %eax  
    addq    $8, %rsp
    ret

Also gcc optimizes printf("..." /* no arguments */) into puts() to avoid parsing the format string with no format specifiers.

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