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When I need to create new tag, I do the following steps:

  • Run command git tag -l | sort -V
  • Look through the list trying to find the latest tag

The list is looking like this:

aftercare-1.1.0
...
rc-1.1.0
...
rc-1.2.0
...
rc-1.3.0
...
rc-1.11.0
...
release-1.1.0
...
release-1.11.1

Sometimes (depends on project) we have a lot of tags and I can miss something looking through list and create tag with wrong name. I have such error couple of times.

When I use command git describe, it give me the last tag name, but sometimes I need to create a tag from another sequence.

Do you delete not meaningful tags (e.g. very old rc tags)? Maybe you have another naming conventions and don't have such problems? How do you know what tag should be the next?

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closed as not constructive by Mat, Sylvain Defresne, CharlesB, Adam Rackis, Sankar Ganesh Feb 18 '13 at 5:05

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
a tag is a snapshot from where it's tagged. it's better keep it there unless you have strong reasons to modify/delete existed tags. besides, you could try git tag --help and have a look at the man page: "On Re-tagging", which might be of some help. – yuwang Feb 17 '13 at 8:22
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Do you delete not meaningful tags (e.g. very old rc tags)?

No, and why should you? Tags use up nearly no space (they're just a small pointer to a commit, with its own name). And the same way you don't delete old commits, old tags are part of your project's history and should stay in your repo.

Maybe you have another naming conventions and don't have such problems? How do you know what tag should be the next?

Use a branching model that makes it easy to see where your next tag should be deduced from. For example, have one long-running branch on which there will only be stable versions, and have another branch (either long-running or newly created each time) on which your RC versions get integrated.

You can read Vincent Driessen's workflow article for a good example of a branch model and workflow. With that, you should be able to derive some guidelines that work for your project and team.

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"Tags use up nearly no space" but the transitive graph of commits they hold on to can be large. Once someone pushed tags from a different repo, so all those commits were there. It wasn't apparent, unless you looked at the tags. – Paul Draper Apr 5 '15 at 3:12
    
"why should you?" The repo I'm using hangs for about a minute or two before doing anything when I do anything against the remote. When I delete all tags, it's instantaneous. Others have suggested an option to prevent the downloading of tags, but I do need the tags created in the past couple days. – John MacIntyre Jul 22 '15 at 16:41

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