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C++ Vector - part of it to point to same address

Hi , my subject might be confusing.

Here it goes.

I got a vector

struct node{
int nodeid;
vector<string> data;
vector<fTable> fdata;
}

struct fTable{
int index;
int key;
}

vector<node> myNode;

as at some function...

void chord::someFunc(int nodeid)
{
    node myTempNode;
    vector<string> data1;
    vector<fTable> fdata1;

    myTempNode.nodeid = nodeid
    myTempNode.data = data1;
    myTempNode.fTable = ftable1;

myNode.push_back(myTempNode);
myTempNode.clear();
}

I will be creating 10000 objects, at this point of time, i only got the value for nodeid.

But for data and fTable, i am setting to some empty string vector and empty fTable vector but i wonder if i create 10000 objects and doing the same thing.

am i creating 10000 empty string and fTable vector

Is there a way i can set all this object point to same string vector (null value) and fTable vector ( empty value) so i can save some memories. considering i will or might create 10000 nodes or so. and memory consumption is a concern to me.

Thanks for all help.

share|improve this question
    
You may also want to check my answer to your previous question. –  Thomas Feb 17 '13 at 10:43
    
if data and fTable` are not empty, should they be the same? –  billz Feb 17 '13 at 10:55

3 Answers 3

No, since the vectors are empty, they don't consume much space and no string or fTable objects are created.

Give your limited c++ knowledge I would stay clear of pointers and stick to values.

You don't need to do any of the (immediately) following, the constructor of node takes care of that. This simply overwrites empty vectors with empty vectors.

node myTempNode;
vector<string> data1;
vector<fTable> fdata1;

myTempNode.data = data1;
myTempNode.fTable = ftable1;

If you give your node a constructor like this:

struct node{
    int node(int id) : nodeid(id) {}
    int nodeid;
    vector<string> data;
    vector<fTable> fdata;
}

then you only need to write:

myNode.push_back( node(nodeid) );
share|improve this answer

Creating a vector does not always create its data : the data of a vector is allocated when needed, so vectors with no data will be likely to take sizeof(std:vector<...>) bytes (if reserved size is 0), and vectors with data will in real take sizeof(vector<...>) + n * sizeof(data), where n is the number of reserved items in the vector. The size of a vector is 28 bytes on my implementation.

1st method: vector as fields. The advantage of having vector fields is they're not dynamically allocated, saving you from a bunch of new/delete manual calls : it is more safe.

2nd method: you can also use pointers as you said:

struct node
{
    int nodeid;
    vector<string>* data; // pointer
    vector<fTable>* fdata; // pointer
};

You can set them to 0 (null), saving the size of a vector minus the size of pointer, per node. When you need a node to have a vector, simply new a vector, and set the appropriated pointer. However, this method will eventually take more space than the previous, because it will also take the size of the pointers. And you will have to manage the delete (it can be done with the node destructor, but may be less efficient that deallocating vectors before node destruction).

Conclusion: I suggest you estimate the total size occupied by your data (ex: 10000 * ...), and see if you have to use a specific model (ie, measure first). Personnally, I advise you to take the first (no pointers).

I also recommend that you use a constructor (or two) for node, for a better code.

share|improve this answer

Yes, use a vector of pointers then, i.e.

struct node {
    node(int nid) : nodeid(nid), data(0), fdata(0) { }
    int nodeid;
    vector<string *> data;
    vector<fTable *> fdata;
}

But beware of memory management: now when a node is deleted, the string and the fTable pointed by data and fdata are not deleted. If these data should be owned by a node once assigned, add a destructor:

struct node {
    node(int nid) : nodeid(nid), data(0), fdata(0) { }
    ~node() {
        for (auto i = data.begin(); i != data.end(); ++i)
            delete *i;
        for (auto i = fdata.begin(); i != fdata.end(); ++i)
            delete *i;
    }
    int nodeid;
    vector<string *> data;
    vector<fTable *> fdata;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The last bit of code is wrong. data and fdata are non-pointer fields, so you cannot delete them... –  Synxis Feb 17 '13 at 10:38
    
This will use even more memory when the vectors are actually filled. –  Bo Persson Feb 17 '13 at 11:00
    
I agree with the two of them. Code corrected. –  user1887276 Feb 18 '13 at 1:25

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